Remembering Sarah Burke

Sarah Burke, the Canadian freeskiing pioneer, wife, and friend, died Thursday from injuries sustained in training.
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Sarah Burke, the Canadian freeskiing pioneer, wife, and friend, died Thursday from injuries sustained in training.
Sarah Burke

It is with great sadness and heavy hearts that we reflect on the death of Sarah Burke. The Canadian freeskiing pioneer succumbed to injuries sustained in a fall while training in the Park City halfpipe.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that "Burke had been comatose and in critical condition since her fall Jan. 10, when she suffered a torn vertebral artery in her neck that caused bleeding in her brain. She also suffered a cardiac arrest at the time of the accident, her family said in a statement, depriving her brain of oxygen and causing "severe" and "irreversible" brain damage that led to her death." (Read the full report here.)

These moments of extreme heartache have reminded us at SKI how blessed we truly are to experience the joys of winter. While snow is falling all across the country, many of us have finally experienced the powdery bliss we long for. Reflecting on Sarah's death, we remember her joy, her love, and her dedicated efforts to improve the sport of freeskiing.

And as we move forward, we carry her spirit with us. Let us not forget her passion and hard work. Let us take some turns in her honor, and let us keep her family and friends in our hearts. Thanks for your goodness and light, Sarah. And thanks for watching us from above: we know who to thank for all the freshies lately.

To donate to the fund established in Sarah's honor, click here. The fund was originally created to support Sarah's husband, Rory Bushfield, and her family with medical expenses. It reached its fundraising goal of $200,000 within a day. Any additional contributions will "go towards post-hospital arrangements such as services and memorial costs and to establish a foundation to honor Sarah's legacy and promote the ideals she valued and embodied."