February 2001

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Features

Email us at liftlines@skimag.com. Or write us at SKI, Liftlines, 929 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Boulder, CO 80302.

Enter At Your Own Risk
Your closing paragraph in "The Path Less Taken" (Turning Points, November 2000) ignored the main reason that we should obey "Out of Bounds" signs. They are usually posted for safety reasons, and if you ignore them you could die! After getting pulled out of an avalanche, losing your lift ticket would be the least of your worries.
Chris Boucher
Brier; Wash.

Up To Date
Your article, "Out With The Old In With The New" (December 2000) was too funny. Where on earth has Stu been for the past 20 years? These "new" techniques have been around since the early Eighties. In fact, Stu's "old" techniques went out with disco! Shaped skis are the best thing since sliced bread. But Stu's "new" techniques are certainly not a result of the shaped ski.
John Martin
PSIA-RM Level 3 Instructor
Parker, Colo.

I have subscribed to SKI magazine almost since I first started skiing in 1967 at the age of 12. In all that time, I can truthfully say that your article, "Out with the Old In with the New," has been the most personally beneficial article I've read. The organization of the article, comparing "old" and "new," has finally allowed me to understand the differences between my antiquated skiing style and the new approach.
Lori Taylor
New Cumberlad, Pa.

The Joy Of Skiing
Thanks for "What's New is Old," (In My View, December 2000). I've been in the teaching business for over 30 years, and it still astounds me that we haven't realized that this is all supposed to be fun, not rivalry. It doesn't matter how people get down the hill near as much as it matters that they enjoy it enough to come back and do it again. As an industry we seem determined to ignore this concept. I applaud you for your continued stance.Ken Klecker
Director of Sport Operations,
Mt. Bachelor
Bend, Ore.

Seen And Heard
I skied at Breckenridge, Colo., yesterday and was contemplating taking a lesson. During lunch, three instructors sat at the table behind me. One said that he doesn't put too much effort into teaching beginners because he knows his students' friends are just going to take them to the top of the mountain and tell them there's an easy way down, making them never want to ski again. Instantly I thought of "Why Ski Schools Fail" (Ski Life, December 2000).
Ron Suhosky
Canyon City, Colo.

As a former ski instructor, I read with great interest "Why Ski Schools Fail." I was an instructor for 10 years, and I have seen enough nepotism, favoritism and discrimination to last a lifetime. There is no money to be made by instructors, except for a select few. You're right on when you say there is a "dearth of professionalism." It is encouraged and maintained by the resorts and the ski school supervisors.
Beth Allen
Sandpoint, Idaho

Count Your Blessings
The Gift of Skiing" (Warren's World, December 2000) was right on target. I have been skiing for years, and my family and I truly enjoy it. Not a day on the slopes goes by that I don't stop and give thanks for the opportunity to enjoy that particular day on the hill, no matter what the conditions. Keep up the great insightful articles, Warren. I look forward to reading them for many years to come, and the same thing goes for your awesome films.
Peter Gillen
Harriman, N.Y.

The Real Deal
To even suggest that these people are ski bums or that their lifestyle is "ski bumming" is like saying that Clinton is honest; it just ain't so ("You Only Live Once," January 2001). When I was ski bumming, everyone was dirt poor. We lived on tomato soup and worked any job that would schedule us at night and came with a free meal and a season pass. We lived in rooming houses or in vans, in summer and in wter. Our clothes were patched, our wallets empty, but our skis and boots were always new. Ski bumming will prove to be a tough way of life when your thrills come from the rise and fall of the slopes, not the stock market or imported wines. Please don't demean the name "ski bum" by pasting it on some wealthy yuppies who can afford to take a six-month vacation.
Ken MacDonald
Sturgen Bay, wis.

If the star of Rin Tin Tin, Lee Aaker, can chuck it all to make a go of being a ski-country lifer, why oh why can't I? Oh, I guess there's the fact that my wife and I don't have 15 large lying around to allow us to take six months off. But hey, a guy can dream, right?
Doug Jacobson
Westchester, N.Y.

Life or Death
Editor's Note: The January 2001 Ski Life article "When Skiers Collide" covered the landmark trial of Nathan Hall, who was convicted of negligent homicide in the death of another skier. Hall faces one to three years in prison. The sentencing is scheduled for January 2001.

Nathan Hall was one of the most competent skiers I've ever met and that whole bit about him allegedly "bouncing off the tops of moguls" is complete crap! The rule is that the uphill skier is at fault, which makes sense, but what about the "ski at your own risk" sign? Don't get me wrong, I'm not condoning skiing uncontrollably fast or telling young readers to go bomb hills, but six years in jail is a bit ridiculous! Don't you think? For an accident?
William Budai
Franklin, Wis.

The manslaughter conviction of Nathan Hall is the best thing to hit the ski industry since the advent of release bindings. It is high time reckless skiers were charged with their irresponsible behavior on the slopes. And this goes double for snowboarders. It is sad that it has taken the death of a skier to wake up the ski world to a long-existing problem: recklesss skiers endanger others.
John Jay Hanlon
Former President
U.S. Ski Writers Association
Naples, Fla.

Finally Earl Holding
You have accomplished that no newsman in Salt Lake has done-nailed an in-depth interview with Earl Holding ("Earl Holding Speaks," November 2000). And, as a former managing editor of the Salt Lake Tribune, I must say it was well done.
Jim England
Salt Lake City, Utah

Earl Holding's daughter was correct when she said, a long time ago, Snowbasin "is so unspoiled." Sadly, that is no longer true. Even though Mr. Holding may believe he is an environmentalist, everyone should understand that dragging a ski resort quickly and forcibly through several decades-for all the wrong reasons-is disheartening.

Since most people will visit Snowbasin when the Utah snow lies deep, they will unfortunately not realize the magnitude of what has been sacrificed in the last few years. The transformation of Snowbasin and the methods employed have destroyed much of Ogden's innocence about how the Olympic dream manifests itself in the real world.
Martin Neunzert
Ogden, Utah

For The Record

In "Vail vs. Whistler: Evolution of Two Ski Towns" (December 2000), Whistler, B.C., was incorrectly placed in the Fraser River Valley.

The first paragraph of Christopher Broderick's letter in Liftlines (January 2000) was actually from a separate letter sent via the Internet. The two letters were mistakenly linked together.

Les Cahn's letter in Liftlines (January 2000) was edited for length. The last phrase "who the hell knows who's coming down the slopes?" was the editor's verbage.Subscriptions & Gifts For all subscription inquiries, call 800-678-0817 or email skisub1@neodata.com. New or renewal subscriptions or change of address requests (please send new and old addresses) can be sent to: SKI, Box 55533, Boulder, CO 80322. Allow six to eight weeks for a change to process. For faster service, visit our website: www.skimag.com.Back Copies & Reprints For back issues contact the TMM Back Issue Dept., c/o SCI Fulfillment Center, 1476 Massachusetts Ave., North Adams, MA 01247; or call 800-647-9964. Editorial reprint orders (minimum order of 500) should be directed to Molly Nakari at 303-448-7607 or molly.nakari@tmm.com. Microfilm editions are available from UMI, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Call customer service at 800-521-0600.Queries SKI does not accept unsolicited manuscripts and assumes no responsibility for their return.Reprints For back issues contact the TMM Back Issue Dept., c/o SCI Fulfillment Center, 1476 Massachusetts Ave., North Adams, MA 01247; or call 800-647-9964. Editorial reprint orders (minimum order of 500) should be directed to Molly Nakari at 303-448-7607 or molly.nakari@tmm.com. Microfilm editions are available from UMI, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Call customer service at 800-521-0600.Queries SKI does not accept unsolicited manuscripts and assumes no responsibility for their return.