Five Bad-Ass Things to do in June - Ski Mag

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Eats: Swiss restaurants sometimes overemphasize potato-and-cheese fueled calorie clogging. So it’s refreshing to stumble upon a joint like Toutone in Andermatt. Toutone presents its seafood, lamb, veal, and pasta with a damn near artistic flair, while emphasizing vegetable complements. Groceries: In Switzerland, you’ll always see Co-Op and Migros grocery stores. Though they close much earlier (like 6 p.m.) than U.S. stores, these can be your best friends. They sell inexpensive wine and beer, as well as great pastries and affordable sundries. Bring your own bags.

How to Do Switzerland Right

In our October issue, Rob Story tackled Switerland's Urner Haute Route, but he neglected to mention some important details, like where to disco and find cheese.

Because it's light so late in the day, you can ski until 8 p.m. in daylight, and then keep skiing until 9 p.m. under the lights at Alyeska. They run Chair 1 until 9 p.m. on Thursdays through Saturday, which lets you access not just groomers, but also short, steep pitches, pillow lines, and mini hucks directly under the chair. Plus, a night-skiing lift ticket costs just $35. In this photo: Shaun Raskin and Paige Brady embrace the storm while riding Alyeska's Chair 1 at around 8 p.m.

Alyeska, Alaska: What To Do While You're There

When you think of skiing in Alaska, you might think about helicopters and film crews. But don't forget about Alyeska, one of the state's few ski areas. The mountain has received 714 inches of snow this winter—and counting. Here's what you'll do while you're there—from night skiing to dining on all-you-can-eat sourdough pancakes.