Gear That Works - Ski Mag

Gear That Works

This is our stuff. We own it, use it, and believe in it too. We think you'll like it, too. Check out this video for interviews with the Skiing staff about why they picked mustard, boxed wine, and a flask as part of the Best Gear of the year.
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Best Gear Feature

Here are a few interviews with the Skiing Magazine staff about their favorite pieces of gear. Mustard, boxed wine, and a flask? Check it out.

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When it comes to keeping skiers warm, trust Norway’s Helly Hansen, which developed the first technical baselayers way back in the 1970s. Top and bottom both sport hydrophobic fibers that transport water away from your skin. Tiny patterns woven into the fabric facilitate the wicking. [$45 for the top, $55 for the bottomsl; hellyhansen.com]

Baselayers That Work

Good baselayers are the kind you don't notice: They'll wick sweat when you're hot, and keep you insulated when you're cold. If you haven't already, it's finally time to ditch those cotton baselayers. Here are eight options to upgrade your collection.

Mother bought me this jacket for Christmas and I’ve worn it every ski day since, rain or shine, backcountry or lifts, Utah, Colorado, Montana, Idaho. It kept me dry, blocked the wind, and looked wicked stylish while doing so. It took a lot of abuse this season but I’m pretty confident it will continue to do so for years to come. www.flylowgear.comKevin Luby, Associate Editor

Our Favorite Gear of the Year

We get to try out a lot of gear around here, but the stuff we truly love can be rare and hard to come by. These are the goods, from boots to barbecue sauce, that we abused the heck out of this winter. We like this stuff a lot, and there's a good chance you might too.

Ripper Wendy Fisher

Working out with Wendy Fisher

Wendy Fisher is a former Olympian, a Crested Butte World Extremes champion, and a mother of two. The Crested Butte resident took her first real hiatus from competitive skiing when she had her first son. But now she’s getting her strength back. Rehabbing from a knee surgery, we hit the gym with Wendy in Crested Butte.

If you are lucky and can sneak away from work to ski powder, why call in sick? Mobile devices have created the ability to bring the office to the slopes. However, my cardinal rule is to shut everything off when going downhill. The last thing you want is a cell phone ringing through your face shots and spoiling an epic run. The most ludicrous move I have made was to jump into Vail’s back with 18 inches of fresh powder just 15 minutes from a mandatory conference call. With no cell signal in the Bowls I jumped on the Tea Cup Express and raced into the lift shack joined the conference, muted the speaker, and ran out for another deep run. I got 3 laps and still got credit for being on the call.

Skip Work, Ski Powder

How to be a ski bum and keep your corporate job, including the five best cities for skiers and ten tips for power chasing.

I’ve only skied the Mastrale a hand full of times at demo days but in my opinion, it offers the best lightweight-to-downhill-performance ratio of any touring boot on the market. It’s an everyday boot for someone that prefers skin tracks over lift lines and wants to do more than swish turns in tennis shoe touring boots. Kevin Luby, assistant editor $599; scarpa.com  

Editors' Gear 2011-12

One of the perks of our jobs as editors is that a lot of shiny new gear comes through our office. It runs the gamut from baselayers that we barely ever take off to who-the-hell-came-up-with-that junk like spangled fur mittens. This is the gear that’s getting us really psyched this season. The stuff we personally use, because we think it’s the best.