How To: Summer Tuning

When you pack up your skis at the end of the season, it’s important to retire them properly — they’ll most likely need a little tuning and TLC after a long season of abuse. We asked General Manager Brian Foley at Pierce Skate & Ski in Bloomington, Minnesota, to share some of his summer-prep techniques — here’s what he had to say.
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Once your foot is in nice and snug, stand with your toe on a one-inch-high block (a book or piece of wood works nicely) and lean forward. Stand like this until the liner has cooled, roughly 10 to 12 minutes. Then pull your foot out of the boot and remove the sock and toe cap. Then put the sock back on and step into the boot to see how it feels. You're all done.

How to Heat Mold Your Boots

If you get a new pair of boots, you should take them to a professional bootfitter to make sure they're completely dialed. But, let's say, for some reason (like you're leaving on a trip tomorrow or you can't afford the bootfitting), you need to heat mold your new ski boot liners yourself. Here's how to do it.

Vail hosts the World Pond Skimming Championships on April 18 during their Spring Back to Vail festival. With two season passes to the winner, the level of ludicrous outfits and ingenious new ways to cross the water is high. With 100 feet to skim, a kicker entrance, hundreds of beer-swilling spectators (and competitors) packed into days of free concerts and spring partying, this is one pond skim festival you don’t want to miss. The pond-skimming is limited to a field of 75, so register online if you want to do it. Photo courtesy of Thomas H. Green/Vail Resorts

Pond Skimming: Where To Do It, How to Do It

The ski season may be winding down, but that means that pond-skimming season is just beginning. We’ve got tips on how to become a pond-skimming pro and what ski resorts host the best ponds and spring festivals to display your newfound prowess. —Brigid Mander