Skiing in Iceland - Ski Mag

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The day our group of international journalists and representatives from Black Diamond Equipment and Polartec arrived in Iceland, the Eyjafjallajökull volcano erupted, causing enough smoke and ash to shut down all airports in northern Europe for almost a week, wrecking havoc on the global economy. We had planned to head south to ski the highest peak in Iceland, 2,110-meter Hvannadalshnjúkur. But road closures as a result of the eruption changed our plans and we headed north instead, to ski the mountains near the town of Dalvík.

Skiing in Iceland: How to Plan a Trip

Even a massive volcanic eruption that shut down all European airports couldn’t halt our ski-touring trip to Iceland. Here are images from a week of climbing and skiing Iceland’s peaks—plus tips on how to plan your own trip there.

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Into the Nines: Skiing in Mongolia

Mongolians have been skiing from A to B for thousands of years. Now, thanks to a booming economy, skiing is becoming a winter sport...of sorts. And when we say “winter,” we mean it: You’ll freeze your bong-bongs off.

When Doug Coombs opened Valdez Heli Ski Guides in 1993, it was the first heli-ski outfitter in Alaska. Now owned and operated by Scott Raynor, VHSG has access to over 2,500 square miles of glaciated terrain, with one run as long as 6,200 vertical feet (it's called the Diamond, and if you're lucky, you'll get to ski off the top). You can book single-day packages starting at $925 (for six runs) or all-inclusive weeklong packages from $7,640. Find out more or book a trip at Valdezheliskiguides.com.

Valdez Heli-Ski Guides

Do whatever it takes: refinance your home, sell your kidney, get a telemarketing job. But at some point in your life, you need to go heli-skiing in Alaska. Here are photos from a day with Valdez Heli-Ski Guides—to show you why it's worth saving for.