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American Keri Herman won a silver at the Winter X Games in Aspen earlier this year, and today, she earned another silver in slopestyle, thanks to her second run, which included a 540 true tail grab.

European X Games

The European X Games finished up today in Tignes, France, with the women's ski slopestyle and halfpipe and the men's ski slopestyle. North American athletes represented on the podium with Canadian and U.S. skiers winning all three of today's events. Here are photos from the day.

Saddle Peak1

Lessons Learned from Montana Avalanche

A recent avalanche ripped Bridger Bowl, Montana's slack country to the ground. We spoke with Eric Knoff, an avy forecaster at the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center, about the fact that tracks don't mean a slope is safe (there were over 200 tracks on the face that slid). This slide was skier triggered, but nobody was caught by the slide. Special thanks to the GNFAC for the photos.

Arosa, Switzerland

Julian Carr's Europe

Pro skier Julian Carr is a hustler. So far this season, he's skied in South America (back in August), Utah, Montana, and Switzerland, and pimped his headwear/apparel brand, Discrete, at trade shows in Denver, Salt Lake, and Munich, Germany. He just sent us these shots from his last few weeks in Europe.

James Heim wishing he were on belay. Location: Last Frontier Heli-Skiing, BC.Check out our suggestions for good gear for steep skiing.The first rule of skiing steeps: Don’t take off your skis. I was 11 years old and I still remember the name of the trail at Big Sky, Montana: Snake Pit. My family was on its first Western ski trip. I wanted to outperform my brothers, so I suggested this steep, rocky glade. Two turns in, panic struck. I inexplicably took off my skis, stacked them across my arms like firewood, stepped downhill, and slipped. I tumbled down hundreds of vertical feet, somersaulted, slammed my knee into a stump, and screamed like a dying rabbit. My parents consoled me by buying me a black-diamond Snake Pit pin from a Big Sky gift shop that I promptly stuck on my school backpack.The second rule of skiing steeps: Know how to self-arrest. And know that self-arresting is difficult without your skis on. When you fall, you’ll most likely be on your side. If you’re not, twist yourself around so your skis are perpendicular to the fall line. If you fall headfirst, roll over so your skis end up downhill, below your body. Now dig your ski edges into the slope as hard as you can to stop. If you lose your skis midtumble, kick hard with the toes of your boots and claw with your hands until you create enough friction to stop.The third rule of skiing steeps: In order to prevent a dangerous collision with trees or rocks, scope out your line carefully before you drop in. Note the locations of dangerous features such as cliff bands, trees, and lift towers so you have a clean run-out if you fall. Find your line and follow it to the bottom. And whatever you do, don’t panic the way I did. All you’ll end up with is a banged-up knee and a lousy pin.

Skiing Steeps: Everything You Need to Know

On steep slopes, the risks are higher—if you fall, it’s harder to stop. But so are the rewards. Pitches tilted past 40 degrees can be thrilling if you overcome your fears and tackle the terrain confidently. Learn how to self arrest and more. —Hillary Procknow