Powder Skiing Footage

To get you stoked for ski season, we've rounded up a few of our favorite deep powder skiing clips. Get ready; it's coming.
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Deep Powder Skiing Pep Fujas Thumb

Pep Fujas, K2 SKEEZE THE MOVIE 3 from Drew Lederer on Vimeo.

Forrest Coots 2009 Sweetgrass Productions Edit from Forrest Coots on Vimeo.

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Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based KGB Productions has a new ski movie out next fall called Wyoming Triumph. Check out the film trailer below, and our interivew with KGB producer Sam Pope on the next few slides.Most ski films travel all over the world to get footage. But you stayed in Wyoming. Why was that? Sam Pope: This concept developed over several years of taking small trips here and there around Wyoming, including  the Wind Rivers, the Wyoming Range, the Snake River Range, the Gros Ventres, the Absorokas, even the west side of the Tetons. We began to realize that there was something special here. The other part of it is just what you said. Other production companies are going on these insanely exotic ski trips all over the world. We want to make the point that we have terrain that good, right here in our backyard of Wyoming. Kind of a "keep it local" thing. The skiing just as good, but the experience is a little more organic. And that's important to us. 

Wyoming Triumph Ski Movie to Debut Fall 2010

Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based KGB Productions has a new ski movie out next fall called Wyoming Triumph, which is all shot in their backyard—the Tetons. We spoke to KGB's Sam Pope about making a local ski movie and how they got the film sponsored by a whiskey company.

Sarah Allen

Best Spring Skiing Photos

You've rated the best bikinis and big airs, and these are your ten favorite spring skiing photos. Vote again for number one. Winner gets a Drift HD170 Stealth POV camera.

KGB Trailer

KGB Productions presents ‘Wyoming Triumph'

Two years ago we set out on a mission to scout the vast and mostly unskied terrain of our home state, Wyoming. Towns and mountains where more people own an elk rifle than a pair of skis. Following countless broken bones, close calls and getting lost we returned home with a story.

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Best Powder Photos

You sent us your best powder shots of the year, and honestly we're pretty impressed (read: jealous). Flip through the gallery and vote for your favorite shots. You can pick five, then we'll narrow it down to the top 20 for a final round of voting. The most popular photographer wins a free pair of Wagner Custom skis (again, jealous).

Warren Miller is arguably the most iconic figure in the world of skiing. His annual ski films are regarded as celebrations of the beginning of each ski season. It all started in 1946 when Miller and a friend moved to Sun Valley, ID, lived in the parking lot in a teardrop trailer and earned money as ski instructors. In their free time, the two would film each other in order to critique their ski techniques. In the summer, they did the same thing while surfing off the California coast. Miller showed his ski and surf films to friends and told stories and jokes while they watched. After receiving countless invitations from friends to show his films and narrate them at parties, he realized he could make his hobby his business. In 1949, he founded Warren Miller Entertainment and began his long-standing tradition of producing an annual, feature-length ski film. He toured his film around to theaters near ski towns each year, often showing it at night, so he could shoot the next year’s footage during the day. Before long, Miller was showing his films in 130 cities a year. In the late 1990s, Miller stepped aside from his hands-on production of the film, but one is still produced annually in his name. Since 1950, Warren Miller Entertainment has produced 59 feature-length ski films—and still counting.

Happy 60th Birthday, Warren Miller Films

In 1949, Warren Miller came out with his first ski movie. This year's 60th film, Dynasty, is touring the country now. We have an exclusive vintage film clip (just recently dusted off from the archive room) from the 1949 film, Deep & Light.