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Sage's Kodak Moments

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Back in the day, big-mountain skiers used Polaroid snapshots to scope their lines.

Back in the day, big-mountain skiers used Polaroid snapshots to scope their lines. “You’d take a pic at the bottom, says film star Sage Cattabriga-Alosa. “Then you’d get to the top, get off the helicopter, and pull out this crappy-resolution, crumpled-up Polaroid. Now, big-line skiers tech it out with digital cameras. Sage — inspired by snowboarder and fellow celluloid ripper Jeremy Jones — also shoots photos right before dropping in. Then he decorates his walls with the memories. Here’s a look.

In 2005, Sage blazed Stormtrooper, a 2,000-foot, 50-degree line outside of Haines, Alaska.

In 2005, Sage blazed Stormtrooper, a 2,000-foot, 50-degree line outside of Haines, Alaska. “I had to beat my slough to a choke 500 feet down, he says. “If I’d got hit by it, I would’ve wrecked and tumbled for 1,500 feet.

“My slough was behind me by about three seconds. When it caught up, it was probably doing around 60 miles per hour. I squirted through just in time, he says. “Once I got through the funnel, it was party time.

Sage skied Spine Cell Research — named by photographer Greg Epstein for its many spines, including this pronounced 300-foot-long walkway — in…

Sage skied Spine Cell Research — named by photographer Greg Epstein for its many spines, including this pronounced 300-foot-long walkway — in Alaska’s Chugach range in February 2005 for Teton Gravity Research’s The Tangerine Dream.

“I wasn’t sure I could get out to the end, Sage says of the two-foot-wide traverse that abruptly falls away to 50 degrees. “I felt like I was on a high wire above all the gnar.