Santa Fe Forest Cutter Still at Large - Ski Mag

Santa Fe Forest Cutter Still at Large

A ski run illegally cut in the Santa Fe National Forest has been in the spotlight recently, and, according to a recent article by High Country News, the crime has still not been solved.
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forestcutter

By Kimberly Beekman

A ski run illegally cut in the Santa Fe National Forest has been in the spotlight recently, and, according to a recent article by High Country News, the crime has still not been solved.

“It goes beyond egoism to egomania,” longtime local James Parker, who discovered the cut in 2015, tells HCN. “It looks like someone cut their own personal run to show their friends this cool new glade they made.”

The problem of illegal cutting is a pervasive one. Back in 2007, Skiing Mag reported that two northern Vermont men were charged with illegally cutting trees in a section of Vermont State Forest on Jay Peak (“Jay’s Big Gash”, December 2007). The cut was 3,000 feet long, and up to 65 feet wide in places; the estimated 873 trees held a replacement value of $47,883.

Read HCN’s full story here: http://www.hcn.org/issues/48.8/whos-cutting-illegal-ski-trails-in-the-santa-fe-national-forest?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email

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The Stash: Take Sunset, skier’s right of the Tesuque Peak chair. Wiggle through the fir, and tuck onto slender Luge, before dropping into boulder-strewn Avalanche Basin.

"That's the cliff Benny skied off of when he first started running the place 25 years ago," says Bill Gould (shown here), Ski Santa Fe ski school director, as he points to the nose of a 60-foot cliff. It's a big cliff. And it has a small landing. As Benny, now 51, tells the story, “Yeah, growing up my philosophy was that speed is your friend. If you thought you needed to go 30 miles an hour to huck a cliff, you should go 40. So I jumped off the top of that thing and 30 feet past the landing knew I was in trouble." He landed in a flat, rocky patch of snow and managed to only break a rib, puncture a lung and fracture his scapula. He was skiing two days later. That's whose been developing the resort. Cliffs, steeps, and trees manage to blend with comfortable groomers, a solid ski school, and a youth race program.

Ski Santa Fe: A Complete Guide

You may go to Santa Fe for the green chile, the Georgia O'Keefe museum, or the turquoise jewelry, but while you're there, you might as well ski some untouched steeps at the Santa Fe Ski Basin. Here's everything you need to know to plan your trip. —Jake Davis