Scorpian Shenanigans

A POV edit from Sun Valley’s most ridiculous closing day tradition: the Scorpian Nationals.
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A POV edit from Sun Valley’s most ridiculous closing day tradition: the Scorpian Nationals.
scorps thumb

Four years ago, a group of Sun Valley locals dug some thirty-year-old mini skis out of random basements and thrift stores around Ketchum, mounted them with rickety old Marker bindings, and created a race of utter downhill mayhem across snow, rock, dirt and concrete. The Scorpian Nationals has since become the most anticipated closing day event at Sun Valley Resort. At 4:30 on the last day, a dozen of the craziest local skiers strap on Scorpians, charge down the final landing strip of snow on a run called Scorpion, sprint to Apple’s Bar, and pound a beer. The winner gets respect. The losers get to chug a free pint. The crowd gets to watch the insanity. And the mountain gets its proper encore to the season. Skiing’s resident small ski schralper, associate editor Kevin Luby, entered the race. Here’s what it looked like.

Want to know more about the high-level performance of the Scorpian. Check this.


MTHDS play at the Snake River Saloon in Keystone, Colorado

Five-Question Interview: The MTHDS

Every ski town has a band. The one locals follow religiously, filling venues three days a week. A skier’s passion for snow is almost matched by a passion for music. If that ski town is Vail, then the band is the MTHDS and they happen to feel the same way.

Reggie Crist in Sun Valley

Inside Line: Sun Valley, ID

Sun Valley oozes history. In 1936, it debuted the world’s first chairlift and became a full-fledged destination resort, drawing visitors like Marilyn Monroe, Ernest Hemingway, and Louis Armstrong. And in 1946, Warren Miller started making ski movies there. Today, Sun Valley’s the home of ski-film stars Zach and Reggie Crist and the premier heli-ski outfitter in Idaho. But the real reason it’s a resort for the ages: Sun Valley’s terrain—ranging from high-speed rippers to wide-open bowls—never gets old.