Revelstoke, BC

Revelstoke, British Columbia, officially opened for business in 2008, and photographer Matthew Scholl caught all the steeps-laced action.

Over the course of three days, guide Karl Salter is able to serve up a smorgasbord of terrain to guests of all abilities. Runs transitioned from open, alpine bowls, to steep tree runs. For the adventurous in our group, Karl delivers big-mountain lines and spines that are reminiscent of  coastal British Columbia and Alaska. There are open powder runs, huckable cliff drops, and plenty of tree jibs to keep the youth in the group stoked.

K3 Cat Ski, BC

Previously called Monashee Snowcats, British Columbia's K3 Cat Skiing is back with a new name and all the same features, including 50-degree pitches, 33,000 acres of terrain, and piles of fresh powder. Here's how to plan a trip there.

Ian McIntosh at Revelstoke, BC, by Blake Jorgensen.After a warm and foggy day, the clouds settled enough for photographer Blake Jorgensen and skiers Ian McIntosh, Kye Petersen, and Lynsey Dyer to ride to the top of British Columbia’s Revelstoke Mountain. Revelstoke, which sits in the Columbia Valley, is notoriously foggy during winter. But unless it’s storming, ascending a few thousand feet is all it takes to poke through to sunshine. “It was warm and the snow was getting pretty manky, so I set up under the cliff in this cave,” says Jorgensen. “Water and ice were dripping all over me and my gear.”


The Focus section of our magazine is where we showcase some of the best photographs of the year, and the stories behind how they were taken. Here is a collection of those images.

Whistler/Blackcomb, B.C.

Inside Line: Blackcomb, BC

With the 2010 Winter Olympics around the corner, all eyes are on Whistler Blackcomb. The masses will descend on Whistler Mountain, where the official events will take place. Which means Blackcomb will be the place to ski. Locals know that Blackcomb outperforms its better-known neighbor when it comes to off-piste terrain and jibbing. Plus, Blackcomb’s lift lines are shorter, its park and pipe bigger, and its backcountry steeper. And with the new Peak-to-Peak gondola—a record-setting 2.73-mile-long feat of engineering—now connecting the two mountains, you can easily zip over to the big W. But with Blackcomb’s terrain, why bother?