Snowboarding Taos (Gallery) - Ski Mag

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This sign is posted at the base area to comfort cowering beginners who stare two black diamonds in the face as they load the chair. It's incredibly cliche, but every time I see it I chuckle.

Taos Ski Valley - Opening Day 2009-2010 Season

Taos Ski Valley kicked off its 2009-2010 season on Thanksgiving with one of their biggest openings ever. It's game on for the best terrain the Southwest has to offer. Enjoy a few shots captured from the day.

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The Day Taos Opened to Boarders

On March 19, a.k.a. T-Day, Taos Ski Valley officially opened its slopes to snowboarding. Skiing Magazine sent one skier, dressed him as a knuckle dragger, and waited for the punches to fly.

Big backflip

Taos Extreme Freeride Championship

Taos reported 36 inches of snow just in time for the Salomon Extreme Freeride Championships, a big-mountain competition taking place this weekend. Friday's comp was held on West Basin, a zone full of steep rocky chutes and huge airs. Only one dilemma: Sit in the sun, soak up the vibe, and watch back flip after front flip or go shred the 36 inches of fresh? Difficult decisions down here in Taos.

mountaincollective

Mountain Collective Adds Taos and Stowe to Arsenal

A Mountain Collective pass will now get you two days at 11 amazing resorts. By Leslie Hittmeier

Located on the West Ridge at Taos, the Elevator Chutes are often home to extreme freeskiing competitions. Elevator and the other chutes on the West Ridge showcase Taos' toughest terrain, which would be a feat on any resort, but Taos has been ranked consistently by SKI and Skiing magazines for having some of the steepest terrain in North America.  Taos' steepness requires more snow, as well. Locals go by the "75-inch rule" where the base has to be at least 75 inches deep before you can put away the rock skis. If going for a visit, don't miss Kachina Peak as well as it has also been ranked as very extreme and is an honorable mention for our list.

7 Things You Need to Know About Taos Ski Valley

Tips on where to ski on a powder day, what not to eat for lunch, and where to find a cheap place to stay.

Trip Ideas: Taos, New Mexico | Photo: Courtesy of Taos

Trip Ideas: Taos, New Mexico

The steeps of Kachina Peak should be on the résumé of any skier who’s got the chiles for it.

Located on the West Ridge at Taos, the Elevator Chutes are often home to extreme freeskiing competitions. Elevator and the other chutes on the West Ridge showcase Taos' toughest terrain, which would be a feat on any resort, but Taos has been ranked consistently by SKI and Skiing magazines for having some of the steepest terrain in North America.  Taos' steepness requires more snow, as well. Locals go by the "75-inch rule" where the base has to be at least 75 inches deep before you can put away the rock skis. If going for a visit, don't miss Kachina Peak as well as it has also been ranked as very extreme and is an honorable mention for our list.

Sochi, Squaw, Chamonix, Verbier…Taos?

Qualify for the 2010 World Freeride Tour events at Taos Ski Resort, March 10-13, and compete for the $12,000 purse.

Taos Ski Valley's Trees

An Ode to Taos

How an iconic ski town’s steeps and chimichangas entice skiers.