Snowshoe Mountain Announces Construction of Lift Mid-Station

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Snowshoe, W.Va.

- Snowshoe Mountain Resort announced today that the resort will install a new mid-station to its Western Express lift. The mid-station will allow Snowshoe to open the upper portion of both Cupp
Run and Shay's Revenge earlier in the season, allowing skiers and snowboarders to access 26 additional acres of terrain in the Western Territory area. Construction on the mid-station began on September 22 and will be completed by Opening Day of the 2008-2009 winter season, which is scheduled for November 26.

The new mid-station will increase Snowshoe's early season uphill capacity by 1200 people per hour. The 26 acres will be made-up of black diamond, expert terrain, giving more advanced skiers and riders more terrain in the early season. A high-speed detachable quad, the Western Express lift will not detach at the mid-station, which means the mid-station will be closed when the entire length of the slopes is opened later in the season. This will allow the lift to increase its speed for the longer trip from the bottom of the slopes.

Celebrating its 35th season this winter, Snowshoe is the mid-Atlantic and Southeast's largest winter resort destination, featuring 244 acres of skiable terrain across three skiing areas. The Western Territory, which is home to two of Snowshoe's 60 slopes, offers some of the East Coast's most challenging terrain with a 1,500' vertical drop along the 1.5 mile slopes. Cupp Run is Snowshoe's signature slope and was designed by three-time Olympic Gold Medalist and skiing legend Jean Claude Killy. The slope is home to Snowshoe's annual Cupp Run Challenge, one of the most anticipated ski races of the winter on the East Coast.

"This mid-station is a huge plus for the more advanced skiers and riders visiting Snowshoe all season," said Ed Galford, Snowshoe Mountain's VP of Mountain Operations. "Because of the scope of the two slopes serviced by the Western Express Lift, snowmaking is a huge endeavor, and Cupp and Shay's are usually two of the last slopes on the mountain to be opened. Now, with a little cooperation from Mother Nature, we should be able to
have the upper portion of the slopes open in time for the Holiday crowds in late December. Most importantly, the mid-station gives us options. We're still committed to having the entire length of the slopes open as early as possible, but now, no matter what Mother Nature offers us in the early months of the season, we'll have some great terrain open for expert skiers and riders."

In addition to the mid-station, Snowshoe has also invested in updates to snowmaking equipment on Cupp Run, and changed the layout of the slope by widening an upper section of the trail. While the Western Territory caters to Snowshoe's more advanced guests, the resort has also invested in improvements to its beginner areas. This season, 15 Techno Alpine fully-automated fan guns will provide improved snowmaking power to Skidder Slope, which services Snowshoe's Ski School in the basin area. The beginner surface lift on Skidder also saw some minor adjustments this summer that will allow for easier on-off loading for beginner skiers and riders. Finally, the Magic Carpet lift in the beginner area at Snowshoe's Silver Creek area was moved in order to enhance the beginner experience and give the Ski and Snowboard School an increased teaching area at Silver Creek.

"We're very proud of the work we've done this summer across the mountain's three areas," said Snowshoe President and COO Bill Rock. "All of these investments show Snowshoe's continued commitment to being the biggest and best resort in the region. I'm particularly excited to share these improvements with our guests this winter as we celebrate our 35th season."


#19: Snowshoe, West Virginia

Snowshoe Mountain

Snowshoe, which is located in the in the Monongahela National Forest, has the most vertical in the state or West Virginia and the only half pipe.

Crystal Mountain Northway Lift

Crystal Mountain’s Northway Lift

Storms in the Pacific Northwest hamper visibility. So get some depth perception in the rocky chutes and protected tree runs accessed by Crystal Mountain’s Northway lift. Before the resort installed the 1,870-vertical-foot fixed-grip lift in 2007, this zone was a backcountry stash for locals. Now the chair helps disperse skier traffic and has increased Crystal’s lift-served terrain by 62 percent.