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Start the Season with Our Photo Annual

Skiing Magazine is kicking off the season with a Photo Annual that includes the best ski images in the world. Find it on newsstands now.


Don't miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.Great ski photography is all about the fleeting moment when the…

Don’t miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.

Great ski photography is all about the fleeting moment when the perfect light meets the perfect background meets the perfect athlete—in a candy-cane parka. All the elements came together for photographer Wade McKoy one day in the Jackson Hole backcountry thanks to Andrew Whiteford’s dramatic interpretation of “Waldo” in a laid-out backflip off a kicker. “The clouds help make this shot special, but they also closed out the blue sky and the good light shortly after the session began,” McKoy says. “Andrew, in his red striped coat, was the only skier who got it in good light.”

Skier: Andrew Whiteford in Jackson Hole

“Zack and I had talked about this spot for years,” says photographer Grant Gunderson. But the patch of rainforest outside Glacier, Washington, rarely, if ever, had snow. Last season, a monster storm cycle rolled through, triggering a massive avalanche that buried highway 512 under 30 feet of snow and deposited tons of debris in the moss-covered forest. Giffin and Gunderson took full advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime situation to shoot this tree jib just off the highway. Of the storm’s carnage, Gunderson says’ “Most of the old locals had never seen anything like it. Neither had I.”

Skier: Zack Giffin near Mt. Baker, Washington

Rising fog on Cody Peak, near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, threatened the day for photographer Wade McKoy and skiers Lynsey Dyer and Shroder Baker, but as…

Rising fog on Cody Peak, near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, threatened the day for photographer Wade McKoy and skiers Lynsey Dyer and Shroder Baker, but as they neared the bottom, the clouds began to dissolve. “It’s somplace I hadn’t shot before,” says McKoy. “But I’ve always wanted to, with a wide-angle lens catching all the cliffs above. The fading fog gave the light a special quality.” So does a wily vet like McKoy still get butterflies setting up for a potential banger? “Maybe a little before but not during. You just get in the zone and you’re happy. Its a real calm feeling – and its a high. You’re just sort of on automatic.”

Skier: Lynsey Dyer near Jackson, Wyoming

Last March, photographer Greg Von Doerston spent a stormy week shooting with TGR Films in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Last March, photographer Greg Von Doerston spent a stormy week shooting with TGR Films in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. “We had pretty good snow,” Von Doersten says. “But we’d been void of sunshine for a couple days.” So Von Doersten and the TGR team decided to head out-of-bounds and try “window-shopping” for better light. They found some, but Von Doersten was happier with the more dramatic storm shots. In this shot, he says, skier Sammy Carlson was, “in typical fashion, stomping his landings, and making something out of nothing.”

Skier: Sammy Carlson near Jackson, Wyoming

Don't miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.Sitting around a Portillo Lodge dinner table with a crew of Salomon…

Don’t miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.

Sitting around a Portillo Lodge dinner table with a crew of Salomon team skiers, photographer Grant Gunderson couldn’t help but notice clearing skies above the towering Andes. Using a long exposure, and a flash to freeze the action, Gunderson captured this shot of freeskiing pioneer Mike Douglas. “It was really exciting because Mike is such a legend,” says Gunderson, proud for having convinced Douglas to leave the table and make a few turns. “I’d never worked with him before.” Perhaps the coolest part about shooting in Portillo, says Gunderson, is that “you don’t have to go far to find amazing terrain.” Gunderson captured the shot only a short hike from the lodge.

Mike Douglas in Portillo, Chile

Photographer Gabe Rogel nabbed this image of freeheeler Nick Devore in Italy’s Dolomite Range, but he was in Africa on a weak wi-fi connection when…

Photographer Gabe Rogel nabbed this image of freeheeler Nick Devore in Italy’s Dolomite Range, but he was in Africa on a weak wi-fi connection when we emailed with him about it. “That’s one of my favorite shots from last winter,” says Rogel. As the Col Margherita tram at Tre Valli ski area rose up through pea soup, Rogel wasn’t hopeful for a good day of shooting. But just short of the top station, the car emerged into a blazing sky. “Gorgeous” is all Rogel could say.

Skier: Nick Devore in Tre Valli, Italy

It was late April in the North Cascades and photographer Garrett Grove and skier Jeff Campbell were joesing for blower.

It was late April in the North Cascades and photographer Garrett Grove and skier Jeff Campbell were joesing for blower. “We spotted this line our first run of the day,” says Campbell of the 45-degree, 1,000-foot-long chute overlooking Washington’s Mt. Shuksan. “The crest of this fin held a sliver of sunlight that just begged to be skied. You can’t say no to those sorts of things.” No, you can’t.

Skier: Jeff Cempbell in the North Cascades, Washington

Slicing through the heart of central Switzerland, the Urner Haute Route is a 34-mile ski tour that’s far less known—and arguably more awesome—than…

Slicing through the heart of central Switzerland, the Urner Haute Route is a 34-mile ski tour that’s far less known—and arguably more awesome—than the famous Chamonix–Zermatt traverse. Last winter, Skiing sent writer Rob Story and photographer Lee Cohen to investigate. Along the way, they encountered skinny-ski-loving Euros, Viking beauties, and one of the biggest squalls of the lean Swiss season. “We were laughing that we were going to waltz right in, get this huge storm, and ski powder the whole time” says Cohen. “And that’s exactly what happened.” Skier: Tyler Sterling on the Urner Haute Route, Switzerland

Don't miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.Casey Baskins is resourceful. After building a jump and shoveling the…

Don’t miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.

Casey Baskins is resourceful. After building a jump and shoveling the snow from the roof into a landing, the Vail local (and basketball lover) decided to jib the hoop at the house where he grew up and still lives and rounded up photographer Connor Walberg to get the shot. “That hoop was a birthday gift from when Casey turned six years old,” says Walberg. “He called me one night and said I needed to check out a feature he had built in his driveway. I never guessed it would be this.”

Casey Baskins at home in Vail, Colorado

Last April, photographer Jay Beyer and freeheeler Chris Erickson set up camp deep in Alaska’s Takinsha Mountains for two weeks of human-powered…

Last April, photographer Jay Beyer and freeheeler Chris Erickson set up camp deep in Alaska’s Takinsha Mountains for two weeks of human-powered powder sessions. “This was our first day,” Beyer says. “Chris was going for another line, but the light shut out of it, so we pointed him to this cool rib, where the light was beautiful, but the snow was awful—all windbuff and ridgey.” Not exactly hero snow but with some help from the backdrop, they nailed the shot. “I like this photo because it shows how huge the terrain is there. In Alaska, everything is big—real big.”

Skier: Chris Erickson in Glacier Bay National Park

Don't miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.Last spring, Salt Lake City-based photographer Adam Barker and…

Don’t miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.

Last spring, Salt Lake City-based photographer Adam Barker and pro-skier Julian Carr conducted a careful study of the ski geology in Utah’s Big Cottonwood Canyon. “There are these really cool, big rock shelves at the top of the peaks,” Barker says. “In this photo, I’m standing on a shelf and Julian is skiing another below me—a super-exposed line that dropped off 30 feet. I waited for the clouds to creep across the sun and for the blanket of light to come across the shelf, then I told Julian to go.”

Skier: Julian Carr in the Wasatch Backcountry

Don't miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.When Team DubSatch, a group of -up-and-coming skiers from Utah,…

Don’t miss the Skiing Magazine Photo Annual on news stands soon. Subscribe here.

When Team DubSatch, a group of -up-and-coming skiers from Utah, showed up in La Parva, Chile, for the first ever Eye of the Condor photo-and-video competition, they were missing a critical part of their team: and photographer and videographer. Luckily, La Parva connected them some local shooters when they arrived. Despite the language barrier, photographer Juan Luis de Heeckeren, videographer Alvaro Zurita, and the DubSatch crew got to work on this massive parking garage feature. Things got easier when de Heeckeren talked a man operating a front-end loader into building them a kicker. Then the two locals called in some buddies to cheer on the American athletes – Leo Ahrens, Carstom Oliver, Eliel Hindert, and Zach Halverson – while they hucked off the structure. The result? This shot from the contest-winning photo portfolio – further proof that it never hurts to befriend a local.

Skier: Leo Ahrens in La Parva, Chile

Photo: Juan Luis de Heeckeren