The New Look of SkiNet: What you need to know.

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Welcome to the redesigned and redeveloped SkiNet.com.

As you can see, we’ve done some work over the summer, but we’re not done yet. The nips, tucks, sucks, and pulls that you see throughout the site reflect upgrades to our tagline: The Ultimate Online Resource for Ski Gear, Ski Travel, Ski Action.

This year we intend to more-efficiently bring you the most up-to-date information about everything in the ski industry related to Gear, Travel, and Action, while remaining the home of

SKI

Magazine, Skiing Magazine, and Warren Miller Entertainment.

This is only Phase One of our five-phased plan so stay tuned for more upgrades throughout the summer and fall.

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What do you love?

Yeah, we all love skiing. Obviously. That’s why we’re here. For the face shots and the glory and the self-congratulatory après stories. But it’s really the little things that make it.

James Heim wishing he were on belay. Location: Last Frontier Heli-Skiing, BC.Check out our suggestions for good gear for steep skiing.The first rule of skiing steeps: Don’t take off your skis. I was 11 years old and I still remember the name of the trail at Big Sky, Montana: Snake Pit. My family was on its first Western ski trip. I wanted to outperform my brothers, so I suggested this steep, rocky glade. Two turns in, panic struck. I inexplicably took off my skis, stacked them across my arms like firewood, stepped downhill, and slipped. I tumbled down hundreds of vertical feet, somersaulted, slammed my knee into a stump, and screamed like a dying rabbit. My parents consoled me by buying me a black-diamond Snake Pit pin from a Big Sky gift shop that I promptly stuck on my school backpack.The second rule of skiing steeps: Know how to self-arrest. And know that self-arresting is difficult without your skis on. When you fall, you’ll most likely be on your side. If you’re not, twist yourself around so your skis are perpendicular to the fall line. If you fall headfirst, roll over so your skis end up downhill, below your body. Now dig your ski edges into the slope as hard as you can to stop. If you lose your skis midtumble, kick hard with the toes of your boots and claw with your hands until you create enough friction to stop.The third rule of skiing steeps: In order to prevent a dangerous collision with trees or rocks, scope out your line carefully before you drop in. Note the locations of dangerous features such as cliff bands, trees, and lift towers so you have a clean run-out if you fall. Find your line and follow it to the bottom. And whatever you do, don’t panic the way I did. All you’ll end up with is a banged-up knee and a lousy pin.

Skiing Steeps: Everything You Need to Know

On steep slopes, the risks are higher—if you fall, it’s harder to stop. But so are the rewards. Pitches tilted past 40 degrees can be thrilling if you overcome your fears and tackle the terrain confidently. Learn how to self arrest and more. —Hillary Procknow