Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Adventure

Top 10 Extreme Runs

Think you can ski Corbet's and the Palisades and call yourself an expert? Check out our list of the most insane terrain in-bounds in North America.

Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ Sign up for Outside+ today.


None
You'll be hard pressed to find

You’ll be hard pressed to find “Climax” on the official Whistler Blackcomb trail map. Sources from the resort haven’t heard of it, and think that it might be a local’s nickname for the Sylvan chute. Either way, it is being kept under wraps for a reason: it’s scary. The red-headed step-child of the Chainsaw ridge just below Blackcomb peak, Climax is the most difficult run at the expansive resort. The chute drops for an initial 300 feet at 50 degrees then gets to a 45 degree angle for a short few turns before bottoming out into the bowl. Rumored to have been named from several “themes” in the 1985 porn, “The Wizard of Aahh’s” (precursor to Greg Stump’s “Blizzard of Aahhh’s”) many of Blackcomb’s steeper runs have dirty names. Perhaps this chute is the ultimate conquest.

Located on the West Ridge at Taos, the Elevator Chutes are often home to extreme freeskiing competitions. Elevator and the other chutes on the West…

Located on the West Ridge at Taos, the Elevator Chutes are often home to extreme freeskiing competitions. Elevator and the other chutes on the West Ridge showcase Taos’ toughest terrain, which would be a feat on any resort, but Taos has been ranked consistently by SKI and Skiing magazines for having some of the steepest terrain in North America. Taos’ steepness requires more snow, as well. Locals go by the “75-inch rule” where the base has to be at least 75 inches deep before you can put away the rock skis. If going for a visit, don’t miss Kachina Peak as well as it has also been ranked as very extreme and is an honorable mention for our list.

Although a visit to Silverton is mainly through a guide, this section of the mountain is by guide ONLY.  The chute is a 53 degree rock encased tunnel…

Although a visit to Silverton is mainly through a guide, this section of the mountain is by guide ONLY. The chute is a 53 degree rock encased tunnel where a guide rope is set up for when you get so scared and you want to bail out. If you’re with a big group, count on spending a good deal of time getting through it, if it’s open. Chances are, unless there has been a big dump, it is too steep to hold snow for very long.

You can be sure that when you head into Montana, you'll be hard pressed to find anything small. That is, except for two couloirs right off of the…

You can be sure that when you head into Montana, you’ll be hard pressed to find anything small. That is, except for two couloirs right off of the Lone Peak Tram called Big and Little Couloirs. The Big Couloir is about 45 degrees and 2,000 feet in length and is for expert skiers only, as stated on the tram before you can load. Before you can even enter the chute, you’ll be checked for the proper equipment as well (shovel, probe, beacon) as many consider this a no-fall zone. Oh, and bring some water and you’re common sense. Lone Peak is at 11,655 feet high. Just enough for the lack of oxygen to deplete your brain functions.

To check out some videos of people skiing the Big Couloir, Click Here and Here.

As with many of the chutes and terrain you'll see on this list, Delirium Dive will be closed unless there is enough snow. Ski patrol monitors the…

As with many of the chutes and terrain you’ll see on this list, Delirium Dive will be closed unless there is enough snow. Ski patrol monitors the area closely, opening the many gates only if they feel it is the right time. The Dive is pretty difficult to get to as well, and is only for the dedicated. Skiers will head through a check-in gate at the top of the Continental Divide Quad and then hike up to the peak of Lookout Mountain. After that skiers have to cross a stairway across a 15 foot rock band and then hike along the ridge to where they want to drop in. Inclines average at 40 degrees over 1,575 vertical feet.

To see one German try to tackle the Dive (and get turned down only to return again), Check out this video.

extreme with the amount of usage a given run will get. If anyone and everyone can ski it, it's probably a green. If it is only skied once or twice a…

extreme with the amount of usage a given run will get. If anyone and everyone can ski it, it’s probably a green. If it is only skied once or twice a season (if it opens at all), it’s probably really extreme. Such is the case with Patrolman’s. You won’t find it on the regular trail map, but it is viewable from the parking lot and requires some major guts to get through it.

None
Known for it's steeps, Crested Butte houses such aptly named runs as

Known for it’s steeps, Crested Butte houses such aptly named runs as “Dead End Chutes,” “Staircase,” and “Hot Rocks,” as well as the US Freeskiing World Championships. If that isn’t enough, the Body Bag Glades should be. The glades as well as Dead Man’s Chute are located in the resort’s “Extreme Limits,” terrain that should be considered out-of bounds if the resort didn’t want to boost its acreage. The Body Bag Glades drop 275 feet at 55 degrees, so you’ll have to stick the landing if you want to live to tell about it.

The topic of extreme skiing is a much debated one. At the Epic Ski forums, one user talked about the allure and difficulty of Schmidiot's. …

The topic of extreme skiing is a much debated one. At the Epic Ski forums, one user talked about the allure and difficulty of Schmidiot’s. “Schmidiot’s very rarely gets skied, first [Scot] Schmidt skied it, then it took about another few years before it even opened and when it did open Eric/Rob Deslauriers tried it and was unsuccessful, a few more years later Robb Gaffney skied it successfully. From what I have heard there have only been a handful of people ever to ski down Schmidiot’s. As it is rarely open due to snow coverage and then when it is open, the skier must have the ability to ski it and the cojones to do it is another thing all together.” The skier has to huck himself 80ft down just to even get in the chute. Jumping is one thing, skiing is another as no-fall zone puts it lightly.

To see a video of people launching themselves off of Schmidiot’s, Click Here.