Top 10 Most Influential Skiers of All Time

We thought of calling this gallery “The Coolest People in the World,” but that might make the non-skiing community angry. The skiers you’ll see here have in one way or another changed the sport of skiing forever. These are our gods. Let us worship them.
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Bahrke tears up the course at Cypress Mountain on February 13.Ready to RideStanding at the top of the course at Cypress Mountain on that rainy night, Bahrke decided to go for broke.“I had such a good feeling in the start gate,” she says. “I qualified in sixth place and I was so mad at myself—I did not work these last four years to get sixth place, so I just pushed out [of the start] like I wanted it.”For me, watching NBC from the couch at home, her run looked like a winner, or close to it. Bahrke thought otherwise.“I went big off the top air, and I thought I made a big mistake and I was really upset at that point but I knew I skied the middle section like I’d been training and just let it rip,” she remembers. “I went really big off the bottom air and finished great. I thought I’d made a significant mistake on the first air, but it turned out you couldn’t see it from the bottom. I got to the bottom and looked at the coaches and they were going insane.”

Freestyle Skier Shannon Bahrke Talks Life After Bronze Medal

With pink hair, a blinding smile, and a silver medal in moguls from the 2002 Olympics, Shannon Bahrke stood out in a crowd before the five-ring circus in Vancouver kicked off. Now she’s won a bronze medal and made multiple appearances on the Today show, finishing her last Olympics as one of America’s darlings. By Olivia Dwyer

Sarah Schleper is back in racing form for her fourth Olympics.Sarah Schleper knows a thing or two about the Olympics, since the Vancouver Games are her fourth appearance with the U.S. Ski Team. She knows the Opening Ceremonies are a can’t-miss event, but she also knows there is no eye in the Olympic storm.That explains why she left Canada after the Opening Ceremonies, and is now speaking with me over Skype from her hotel room in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where she’s training with the U.S. tech team until returning to Vancouver on February 19. I can hear her two-year-old son, Lasse, playing in the background as she talks about how her life has changed since 2006.

Schleper Returns for Fourth Olympics

A lot has changed since Sarah Schleper skied for the U.S. at the 2006 Olympics in Turin. On hiatus due to a knee injury, she fell in love and got married. Then she took another winter off to have her son. Now she’s back, competing in Vancouver with her new family cheering her on. By Olivia Dwyer