Tune your Skis for the Season - Ski Mag

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“Cleaning” a ski consists of stripping the base of any fluorocarbons or other materials that might harm the ski. To do this, use an iron to apply a generous amount of hydrocarbon wax, and quickly scrape it off before it cools. Once the wax is removed, use a steel, brass, or bronze brush to further clean the bases. 

How To: Summer Tuning

When you pack up your skis at the end of the season, it’s important to retire them properly — they’ll most likely need a little tuning and TLC after a long season of abuse. We asked General Manager Brian Foley at Pierce Skate & Ski in Bloomington, Minnesota, to share some of his summer-prep techniques — here’s what he had to say.

Ushuaia Tom Day

How to Make Your Own Adventure Ski Film

Serac Adventure Film School catapults aspiring filmmakers into the Colorado backcountry. From January 25 to February 2, learn how to make your own movie while snow camping, hut traveling, and working with film-school mentors.

Once your foot is in nice and snug, stand with your toe on a one-inch-high block (a book or piece of wood works nicely) and lean forward. Stand like this until the liner has cooled, roughly 10 to 12 minutes. Then pull your foot out of the boot and remove the sock and toe cap. Then put the sock back on and step into the boot to see how it feels. You're all done.

How to Heat Mold Your Boots

If you get a new pair of boots, you should take them to a professional bootfitter to make sure they're completely dialed. But, let's say, for some reason (like you're leaving on a trip tomorrow or you can't afford the bootfitting), you need to heat mold your new ski boot liners yourself. Here's how to do it.

Andy Campbell

Find Your Stolen Skis

Last winter, X Games Mono Skier X competitor Andy Campbell had two of his skis stolen in Steamboat, Colorado. Fortunately for Campbell, he’s an active member of Teton Gravity Research’s ski/snowboard forum.