Why SUP Is Good for Skiers - Ski Mag

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Jeremy Benson mountain biking. Photo by Eric Asistan.

Mountain Biking is Good for Skiers

Not that you needed an excuse to go ride. But it turns out, mountain biking counts as ski conditioning too. Pro skier Jeremy Benson tells us why and suggests a few good trails to check out.

Rachael Burks and Julian Carr have their mean faces on. They're grunting, gasping, making expressions that are usually unwanted when taking ski photos. In this case, they can’t help it.  Burks and Carr are at Boxing is For Girls, a Salt Lake City gym geared toward beating the snot out of people—and not just ladies—in the name of fitness. They’re going through trainer Eliza James’ specially designed Chance workout, an ass-kicker that combines strength, endurance, and pushing your pain threshold. Ironmen and marathoners can’t even get through it, not even close. But Burks and Carr are definitely trying—and as some of the most badass skiers out there, they are doing a solid job.  “Work hard for your break, come on!” James yells. “You want all your hard work to pay off.”

Boxing is for Skiers

Rachael Burks and Julian Carr get put through a brutal boxing workout to see if they’ve got what it takes. Turns out skiers are good athletes.

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Skiers of the Year

These are the skiers we've had our eyes on this winter, from X Games gold medalists, and the queen of big mountain skiing, to the two-million-foot man.

I can already grumbling from you locals on this one, but listen up. Locals avoid the hill on weekends like Aretha Franklin avoids the salad bar. They whine about the ineptitude of all the tourists, and every region seems to have a different vernacular for them. In Tahoe, they’re gapers. In Colorado, they’re Texans (no matter where they’re from). Back East, Joeys. Whatever we’re calling them, let’s take a deep breath, let go of the hatred, and see these folks for what they are. First and foremost, they keep our mountain economies healthy and churning. If tourists didn’t come to our towns and drop exorbitant amounts of cash on lodging, food, and equipment, many of us would be out of a job and back in some city jockeying a cubicle Monday to Friday. Secondly, they want to be like us. They come skiing because they want to be a part of the life we live every day. Sure, many of them are downright comical in their attempts to be a part of that culture, but the fact remains, they want to be here. So keep laughing when that you see that Texan, barreling down the hill in his power-wedge of doom, with Wrangler’s tucked into his rental boots with a belt buckle like a Thanksgiving turkey platter. But have some respect at the same time. Most non-locals are ultra-friendly and don’t want to cause you any trouble, so let it go and smile.

New Year's Resolutions for Skiers

So there I was, standing in line at the local six-pack, silently fuming at the masses of gapers who couldn’t manage to count in even numbers, and the lackadaisical lift ops offering as much help as a bucket of hot water at an Igloo commune, when I got to thinking about some things that we skiers could do this year to strengthen our snow-worshipping community and make skiing even more fun. Here are some New Years resolutions for skiers.

Stefan Thomas grabbing some tail above Park City's Eagle superpipe.

Train Like an Olympian in Park City, Utah

January is "Learn a Snow Sports" month. So why not pick up Nordic jumping? As the 2010 Olympic athletes gear up for their trip to Vancouver in a few weeks, you can fine tune your own skills at Olympic events in Park City, the site of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. They've got introductory courses in nearly all Olympic disciplines, from bobsledding to curling to slalom skiing.