Dalbello Axion 10 (2011) - Ski Mag

Dalbello Axion 10 (2011)

The emphasis is on comfort, and it’s hard to imagine any foot that wouldn’t find the fit of the Axion agreeable. The three-piece shell is as easy to put on and take off as any boot on the market. The performance isn’t edgy, and the rearward support could have more integrity, but the Axion sets intermediates up for relaxing fun, with a stance geometry that won’t hold them back.
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Axion 10

Rating: 0.00 / 5
Price: $550.00
Year: 2011
Level: 2
Gender: Male

Toebox fit: 0.00 / 5
Forefoot fit: 0.00 / 5
Ankle fit: 0.00 / 5
Instep fit: 0.00 / 5
Adjustments: 0.00 / 5
Closure: 0.00 / 5
Response: 0.00 / 5
Support: 0.00 / 5
Flex: 0.00 / 5
Steering: 0.00 / 5
Comfort: 0.00 / 5
Average Score: 0.00 / 5

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