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What’s Great (and What’s Less Great) About Dragon’s Ultra Sunglasses

The Dragon Ultra sunglasses are large and in charge. Here's one editor's honest opinion about what works and where there is room for improvement.

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Time for some brutal honesty: I have a big head. My oversized dome makes testing ski helmets, goggles, and sunglasses a pain because normal-sized gear doesn’t fit, or even when it does, it looks way too small on my face. So after reading the sunglasses round-up in the January/February 2021 issue of SKI, I grabbed a pair of the Dragon Ultra Sunglasses—listed as the biggest sunnies in the round up—and started testing them right away.

What’s Great About the Dragon Ultra Sunglasses

Every time I put them on, I am stoked about just how big the lenses are and how well they work. The sunglasses’ square-shape does a great job of keeping my eyes shaded, and Dragon’s Lumalens technology blocks 100-percent of UV light and reduces glare well enough that I will probably fly fish with them this summer.

Additionally, Dragon uses environmentally friendly plant-based resin for the frame construction and combines it with metal on the arms to provide both durability and style. Speaking of style, the Ultra sunglasses look frickin’ sweet, with elements borrowed from Dragon’s heritage that will make anyone wearing them feel cool. For sunglasses in this price range, making sure the person wearing them feels good is important, and the Ultras ooze confidence.

Related: Sweet Protection Ronin RIG Sunglasses

What’s Not So Great about the Dragon Ultra Sunglasses

While the lenses of these sunglasses are definitely oversized, the frame’s overall width and nose spacing is still designed for average-sized heads and faces. For my big noggin, the arms are just a touch narrow and the front sits a touch high on the bridge of my nose. Sort of like a day-old mosquito bite that just occasionally itches as it fades away, the overall frame is just slightly uncomfortable on my face.

One other thing is that when the arms are folded, they make direct contact with the lenses. Not a big deal if you keep your sunglasses in the car, but if you put them in your pocket and ski all day, micro-scratches will eventually start to develop when the sunnies get jostled. Because the lenses are oversized, the tiny scratches are not in the line of sight, but the design flaw can bug anyone who prefers scratch-free lenses.

Thanks to the quality and performance, the Dragon Ultra sunglasses will continue to be a staple for me during après this ski season and beyond. But I would still love to see more optics brands make good-looking options that work well and, most importantly, fit big heads rather than good-looking options that are designed to look big but fit regular faces.

Dragon Ultra MSRP: $129, DragonAlliance.com
Get More Options: The Best Sunglasses for Skiers