Dynastar Legend Sultan 85 (2011) - Ski Mag

Dynastar Legend Sultan 85 (2011)

High marks across the board speak to the Sultan 85’s balance of skills. It’s an ideal intro-to-rocker ski for the traditionalist. A touch of early rise—starting about 18 cm back from the tip of the ski—gives it smoothness and flow in powder and crud. But bomber construction—vertical sidewalls, wood core, two sheets of metal—and traditional camber along the majority of its length give it the snap and rebound that some all-mountain experts still prefer. It’s solid and fluid, quiet on the snow but never lifeless. “A solid ski for solid skiers,” said Preston.
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Dynastar Legend Sultan 85

Rating: / 5
Price: $1060.00
Year: 2011
Level: 2
Gender: Male
Waist Width:
Tip/Tail/Waist: 126/85/110
Lengths: 178

Stability at speed: 3.71 / 5
Hard snow performance: 3.71 / 5
Crud performance: 3.23 / 5
Forgiveness: 3.18 / 5

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Dynastar Legend Sultan 94 (2011)

Here’s a super-sized version of the Sultan 85 (see No. 2). Dynastar gives it the same burly construction (it scored a shade higher in Stability); the differences are simply width (94 mm instead of 85) and rocker (about 23 cm in the tip instead of 18), plus a slightly longer sidecut radius that prefers going down the hill instead of across it. The result is a surfier, floatier feel that’s more at home in soft snow and a little less versatile for frontside applications, though it’s still among the favorites. Testers gave it the top score in Crud Performance. “Strong, well balanced; perfect for rooting out the last pockets of powder,” said Elling.

2011 Rossignol Avenger 85Ti

Rossignol Avenger 82 Ti (2011)

In a category of race-bred Type A carvers, the Avenger isn’t afraid to let its fun, playful side show, and testers universally loved it for that. Talk about balance of skills: The Avenger earned the top mark in only one criterion, but was so strong across the board that it earned the No. 1 ranking overall. That one criterion? Forgiveness. Sure, it’s a race-ready, wood-core construction with two sheets of metal and stout sidewalls, but it never forgets that skiing is supposed to be enjoyable. “Easy, smooth, creamy feel,” said Preston. “An all-around winner.”

2011 Exclusive Eden

Dynastar Exclusive Eden (2011)

Some skis are like Meryl Streep, expressive and sensitive to your every thought. This one is like Rambo—out for first blood. Our stronger and/or heavier testers were huge fans, feverish about its wood-core, sandwich/sidewall construction and scoring it highly in Overall Impression—perhaps the most important criterion in the test. Our lighter girls, though, found it a bit bullheaded and ranked it last among winners in Forgiveness. But everyone agreed that when crud comes your way, the Eden will flex all its muscles, if only you have the strength to hang on. “A powerhouse!” said Shultz.

2011 Rossignol S7

Rossignol S7 (2011)

Think you’re not a very good powder skier? Don’t decide till you try the category-crushing S7. There’s nothing special about the construction: A sheet of Titanal gives it just enough power and dampness; 30-degree sidewalls take a beating. The secret’s in the shape. Traditional camber and sidecut underfoot provide a comfy home base. Tip and tail are rockered and reverse-sidecut. The tip is smeary, floaty, undemanding; the tail sinks readily when you need to dump speed. The S7—No. 1 in six criteria—forgives almost any mistake; and we tested the 195 cm. Ski as aggressively as you dare; it bails you out every time. “The ultimate powder tool,” said Preston.

2011 G-Power

Blizzard G-Power FSIQ (2011)

While it’s amazing what some of the wider skis in the category can do, nothing beats a narrow waist for quickness and edge-grip. Throw in a dose of exciting rebound energy and a ton of sidecut, and you’ve got one thrilling ride. The G Power is a race ski with manners—quiet, confident and obedient in high-speed arcs. Carve technicians will love it, and corduroy is its preferred medium, but its supreme Quickness (No. 1) translates well to moguls. (Hence its No. 1 ranking in Balance of Skills.) Little ski; big fun. “Super lively feel combined with superior carving performance,” said Scholey.

2011 Nordica Girish

Nordica Girish (2011)

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K2 Aftershock

K2 After Shock (2011)

K2 goes deep with rocker. Almost every ski in the line gets some, from huge helpings in powder skis to subtle tip rocker that makes hard-snow skis easier for skidders to pivot. In an all-mountain ski like the After Shock, a 15-cm section of tip rocker gives it float in powder, smooth shock-absorption and quickness in bumps and crud, and forgiving maneuverability on hard snow. That left our 174 cm test length with about 160 cm of traditional camber—plus two sheets of metal—with which to carve trenches as deep as we cared to. “Fun, lively, quick and easy. A true one-ski-quiver ski,” said Garrett.