Fischer Watea 94 (2011) - Ski Mag

Fischer Watea 94 (2011)

Fischer has gone to great lengths to lighten up the 94-mm Watea, milling out parallel channels in the core, then filling them with reinforcing carbon-fiber I-beams. Then it gives the tip a unique shape—a 3D prow like the hull of a speedboat—the better to slice through soft snow. The result: The Watea 94 was No. 1 for Flotation and No. 2 in Crud Performance. As testers pointed out, there are quicker and more energetic skis in the category, but the Watea loves cruising in long, fast arcs on the groomed while waiting for the next powder day. “Fun at high speeds; awesome in crud; all-mountain versatile,” said Boller.
Author:
Publish date:
Fischer Watea 94

Rating: / 5
Price: $850.00
Year: 2011
Level: 3
Gender: Male
Waist Width:
Tip/Tail/Waist: 130/94/118
Lengths: 186

Stability at speed: 3.79 / 5
Hard snow performance: 3.42 / 5
Crud performance: 3.67 / 5
Forgiveness: 2.89 / 5

Related

Dynastar Sultan 94

Dynastar Legend Sultan 94 (2011)

Here’s a super-sized version of the Sultan 85 (see No. 2). Dynastar gives it the same burly construction (it scored a shade higher in Stability); the differences are simply width (94 mm instead of 85) and rocker (about 23 cm in the tip instead of 18), plus a slightly longer sidecut radius that prefers going down the hill instead of across it. The result is a surfier, floatier feel that’s more at home in soft snow and a little less versatile for frontside applications, though it’s still among the favorites. Testers gave it the top score in Crud Performance. “Strong, well balanced; perfect for rooting out the last pockets of powder,” said Elling.

2011 Watea

Fischer Watea 114 (2006)

Fischer’s widest ski features a subtly rockered forebody this year, along with Powder Hull Technology—a tip shaped like a boat prow, the better to part the snow in its path. Given the 114’s size, it still lacks quickness, but that’s not a problem at speed in bottomless powder, where it thrives with a loose, smeary feel. The rocker adds a dose of maneuverability, and powerful skiers will love its beefiness. The construction is a surprising blend of power in a lightweight frame—wood core, metal-free, but with carbon-beam reinforcement. “Solid, stable and purposeful, with nice flotation,” said Gleason.

Dynastar Course TI

Dynastar Course TI (2011)

We said “hard snow,” and Dynastar took us at our word. Straight out of the race collection comes the Course Ti. It’s a full-on, metal-reinforced, square-sidewalled speed demon with an ice-biting 72-mm waist. Flotation and Crud Performance? Not its bag. But it’s so good at what it does—medium-radius arcs on hard snow, the faster the better—that testers loved it. (Check out the Overall Impression ranking: No. 3.) Forgiving? Only compared to FIS-level race skis. But carve technicians and citizen racers will rip the groomed with confidence. “Exemplifies the best attributes of the ‘cheater race ski,’” said Garrett.

2011 Fischer KOA84

Fischer KOA84 (2011)

We’re still scratching our heads: A tank that plows through crud like this one does shouldn’t be able to effortlessly dice up tight trees, too. The Koa 84 is a standout for striking the perfect balance: a solid powerhouse that’s ridiculously easy to ski. Its hallmark is a glued-to-the-snow feel (it’s No. 1 in Hard-Snow Grip), which lends the driver the assurance to send it into the trees without checking speed. It’s predictable, stable, and has a ripping, racy feel. Its heavier weight is comforting, but it sinks more than most in powder. “A stable ski that rips in all conditions,” said Beale. “I was a charging animal on this ski!”