Fischer X-110 (2011) - Ski Mag

Fischer X-110 (2011)

Stand up and look at your feet: In your natural stance, they’re likely abducted—that is, heels in, toes out. Fischer builds that natural stance into all its Soma boots. It makes it easier to get on edge more quickly and more solidly. The effect is more pronounced in the stiffer X-120, but the 110, with its 100-mm forefoot width, is simultaneously balanced, sensitive and forgiving.
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Fischer X-110

Rating: 0.00 / 5
Price: $695.00
Year: 2011
Level: N/A
Gender: Male

Toebox fit: 0.00 / 5
Forefoot fit: 0.00 / 5
Ankle fit: 0.00 / 5
Instep fit: 0.00 / 5
Adjustments: 0.00 / 5
Closure: 0.00 / 5
Response: 0.00 / 5
Support: 0.00 / 5
Flex: 0.00 / 5
Steering: 0.00 / 5
Comfort: 0.00 / 5
Average Score: 0.00 / 5

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