Head Vector 100 One (2011) - Ski Mag

Head Vector 100 One (2011)

Head gives the more established brands a run for their market share with winners like this. The Vector 100 shines in its combination of comfort and modest performance. The forefoot is cavernous, but where a modicum of snugness is needed for performance—in the ankle/heel area—it’s there. Advanced intermediates and relaxed experts will be set up to succeed.
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Head Vector 100 One

Rating: 0.00 / 5
Price: $570.00
Year: 2011
Level: N/A
Gender: Female

Toebox fit: 0.00 / 5
Forefoot fit: 0.00 / 5
Ankle fit: 0.00 / 5
Instep fit: 0.00 / 5
Adjustments: 0.00 / 5
Closure: 0.00 / 5
Response: 0.00 / 5
Support: 0.00 / 5
Flex: 0.00 / 5
Steering: 0.00 / 5
Comfort: 0.00 / 5
Average Score: 0.00 / 5

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Head Vector 100

Head Vector 100 (2011)

Testers preferred the stiffer flex and richer features of the Vector 120 (below), but the 100 will be a more appropriate model for lighter-weight or less aggressive skiers. It lacks the innovative buckles, but shares the same basic geometry. The fit is very generous, yet it still grips your foot firmly enough to provide leverage. And the upright stance promises all-day comfort.

Head Vector 120

Head Vector 120 (2011)

First: cool buckles. The Spineflex catches look and work like interlinked vertebrae. The flexibility improves the way the boot wraps your foot. Head has established itself as a legit but underrated player in recent years. The Vector 120 is a great example: It’s roomy—a full 103 mm in the forefoot—but grips your foot well. An impressive mix of comfort, performance and quality.

Head Dream 12.5 One

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Women who have fit problems but still crave performance shouldn’t give up before trying Head’s cleverly designed Dream series. The 12.5 offers fit tension more like what you’d expect from a 98-mm last than a 102, but the cuff of both the liner and the shell offer broad adaptability for troublesome calves. A race boot it’s not, but it’s aces for comfort and solid performance.

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Head Dream 9.5 One (2011)

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Lange Exclusive RX 100

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Atomic 90W

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