Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Gear

Inbounds: Back Bowls—What To Take

The back bowls are a good place to practice out-of-bounds ski and expedition techniques, which include skiing with a pack and knowing how to self arrest. (To learn how, visit skimag.com/selfarrest.) But keep your aggro attitude in check. Don't be the guy lugging a 40-pound expedition pack around the mountain. As always, carry only what you need.

Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ Sign up for Outside+ today.


None

Arc’teryx’s Silo 18 is a perfect in-bounds day pack. It’s big enough (1,100 cubic inches) to carry an extra layer, spare gloves, goggles and your lunch, yet its low profile makes it comfortable to wear on the chairlift. And its center ski carry system will hold your skis securely if you need to bootpack a short distance. $99 arcteryx.com

None

K2’s Adventure poles – with and optional built-in avalance probe that’s marked with a snow depth ruler and inclinometer – have a telescoping function that allows you to adjust the shaft and lock it into position. The closer: a utility hook on the grip that lets you adjust a touring binding’s heel lift or unbuckle your boots. $140 with probe, $75 without; k2sports.com

None

If you have both hiking and skiing on your agenda, you’ll want a performance sock that wicks moisture from your skin and articulates to prevent chafing. Bridgedale Control Fit socks are designed for expedition skiers, with tapered cushioning to protect your shins from boot bang. $22; bridgedale.com

None


You don’t need a special setup in the bowls if you’re not traveling too far uphill. But if you want to check out some alpine-touring equipment, the MARKER Duke ($495) is as good a place as any to start. This year, Marker introduced the Baron ($435), a lighter version of the Duke with a lower max DIN-setting (12 compared to the Duke’s 16). Both bindings are great for uphill travel and traversing, but they’re sturdy enough when locked down in descent mode to accommodate the heavy and supportive boots that most alpine skiers prefer. markerusa.com

None

The Highgear ATF8 logs your current and maximum altitude and clocks your rate of ascent and descent. It also includes a digital barometer that displays air pressure, temperature and even a weather forecast. $170, highgear.com