Kastle LX82 (2013)

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Rating: / 5
Price: $999.00
Year: 2013
Level: 2
Gender: Male
Waist Width: 82
Tip/Tail/Waist: 127-82-109
Lengths: 156, 164, 172, 180

Kastle says the LX82 is one of its biggest sellers in the U.S. market, thanks to a versatile waist width (82 mm) designed to succeed in a wide array of snow conditions and terrain. Kastle's LX line of all-mountain, frontside oriented skis is designed to suit the needs of skilled but lighter-weight experts (particularly women) who don't have the heft--or carry the speed--to sufficiently bend the stiffer skis of Kastle's MX line. The LX still gets two sheets of metal, but Kastle gives it a thinner profile to enhance flexibility and reduce weight, adding an edge-to-edge cap of glass over the wood core to keep it torsionally stiff. Traditional camber yields snappy response and positive tip and tail pressure. The rounded tail releases more easily than the square MX tail. The Hollowtech tip is a Kastle signature: All but a thin translucent layer of glass is removed from an egg-shaped section of the tip. This reduces swing weight, and because there's less mass, tip vibration is reduced, both in amplitude and duration, so the ski is quieter on the snow and the edges are locked into the snow sooner and longer. Kastle this year increased the size of the Hollowtech oval and says it now cuts up to 15 percent from the weight of the shovel.

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Kastle LX82

Kastle LX82 (2011)

What’s with the oval cutaway in the tip of every Kastle? That’s Hollowtech, and it’s a Kastle hallmark harking all the way back to the ’76 Innsbruck Olympics. A lighter tip vibrates less, so the edge remains engaged, and reduced swing-weight gives it a more nimble feel. At 82 mm, the LX82 lacks some quickness edge-to-edge. That might be a problem in bumps, but it’s a blessing on powder days. And overall this flagship of the new LX line of lighter, softer Kastles offered a smooth and velvety ride that was enjoyable in crud as well as on the groomed. “Nice balance of power and finesse,” said Scholey.