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Jackson, Wyoming

20 New Year's Resolutions for Skiers

If your New Year's resolution is to finally ski Jackson Hole, we are here to help. Check out our goals for 2010 (including carpooling to the ski hill and buying powder skis) then tell us what your ski-related New Year's resolution is and you can win a four-day trip for two to Jackson Hole, Wyoming (including airfare, lodging, and lift tickets!).

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Get in the Gym: Fitness for Skiers

We all get it—after a long day at the office, it's tough to find the motivation to work out. But, diligence always pays off. Here are the best tips and tricks to make the most out of your gym time, so that when winter rolls around, you'll be ready.

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A Skier’s Dictionary

10 made-up terms and phrases every skier should know, including “bootgasm” (the pleasurable relief of removing your ski boots at the end of the day) and “man soup” (five or more guys in a post-ski hot tub). Plus, a few tips on making the most of each term.

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Farm-to-Table Dining For Skiers

As the U.S. culinary world regresses to the notion of eating locally and seasonally (and caring where food comes from), farmer’s markets, CSA’s and farm-to-table restaurants are on the rise. The locavore movement is essentially sharing a solid commitment to using primarily naturally-raised and organic ingredients sourced directly from local farms and farmers' markets. Of course, come winter, it's a much bigger challenge. The following ski country eateries are dedicated to keeping it as fresh and local as possible.

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Three Unusual Sports Drinks

Yes, staying hydrated and replenishing electrolytes is a good idea. But artificial colors and flavors have rendered some popular sports drinks less than healthy. Here are a few non-traditional options.

I can already grumbling from you locals on this one, but listen up. Locals avoid the hill on weekends like Aretha Franklin avoids the salad bar. They whine about the ineptitude of all the tourists, and every region seems to have a different vernacular for them. In Tahoe, they’re gapers. In Colorado, they’re Texans (no matter where they’re from). Back East, Joeys. Whatever we’re calling them, let’s take a deep breath, let go of the hatred, and see these folks for what they are. First and foremost, they keep our mountain economies healthy and churning. If tourists didn’t come to our towns and drop exorbitant amounts of cash on lodging, food, and equipment, many of us would be out of a job and back in some city jockeying a cubicle Monday to Friday. Secondly, they want to be like us. They come skiing because they want to be a part of the life we live every day. Sure, many of them are downright comical in their attempts to be a part of that culture, but the fact remains, they want to be here. So keep laughing when that you see that Texan, barreling down the hill in his power-wedge of doom, with Wrangler’s tucked into his rental boots with a belt buckle like a Thanksgiving turkey platter. But have some respect at the same time. Most non-locals are ultra-friendly and don’t want to cause you any trouble, so let it go and smile.

New Year's Resolutions for Skiers

So there I was, standing in line at the local six-pack, silently fuming at the masses of gapers who couldn’t manage to count in even numbers, and the lackadaisical lift ops offering as much help as a bucket of hot water at an Igloo commune, when I got to thinking about some things that we skiers could do this year to strengthen our snow-worshipping community and make skiing even more fun. Here are some New Years resolutions for skiers.