Nordica Radict (2011) - Ski Mag

Nordica Radict (2011)

The first thing you notice is how huge it is. Then the scary clown. Then the tip profile: There’s almost no upward curve to it. The new Radict has traditional camber underfoot—about 60 percent of its length—with pronounced rocker tip and tail. The tip rocker starts 40 cm back and rises almost a full 3 cm—so high there’s no need for much additional tip curvature. The combination of width and rocker adds up to supreme flotation in the deepest pow. Testers had to punish it for lack of versatility, but still gave it the No. 2 ranking for Overall Impression. “Surprisingly maneuverable for its size; super fun,” said a tester.
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2011 Nordica Radict

Rating: / 5
Price: $899.00
Year: 2011
Level: 3
Gender: Male
Waist Width:
Tip/Tail/Waist: 157/127/146
Lengths: 185

Stability at speed: 2.53 / 5
Hard snow performance: 2.25 / 5
Crud performance: 3.95 / 5
Forgiveness: 3.90 / 5

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2011 Nordica Girish

Nordica Girish (2011)

Girish—Sanskrit for “lord of the mountains”—is an apt name for this versatile multitool. Every other ski in the category has one weakness, usually lack of quickness or hard-snow grip. The Girish puts up high scores across the board. A wood-core, metal-reinforced laminate layup gives it power and stability (and a No. 2 ranking in Hard-Snow Grip), while a touch of tip rocker—40 cm long, up to 4 mm high—gives it a nice looseness and creamy flotation in powder (and a No. 2 ranking in Quickness). There are bigger, stronger skis, but none more versatile. “An all-mountain fat super-G ski with the godsend of rocker; perfect combination,” said Elling.

Nordica Conquer

Nordica Conquer (2011)

One would expect a hard-snow ski with a waist width of 84 mm to be the most versatile in the category (No. 1 in Flotation, Stability and Crud Performance). But what surprised us was that it still managed a No. 2 ranking in Quickness edge-to-edge. The Conquer is everything for everyone. It’s solid and predictable yet humming with energy; smooth and powerful yet—with a 20-percent lighter wood core than last year’s model—surprisingly easy to ski. Simply put, it’s fast, and it’s a blast. “The Conquer will never give up on you,” said Moscarella. “It continues to provide tenacious grip no matter what you throw at it.”

2011 Nordica Jet Fuel

Nordica Jet Fuel (2011)

The Jet Fuel makes a lot of skis in the category feel like river barges. That’s how light, lively and quick it is. The layup is classic: wood core, vertical sidewalls, two sheets of metal. But this year Nordica lightens it up by using a less-dense wood core and replacing a section down the middle with foam. Nordica says it’s 20 percent lighter, and that weight savings is immediately apparent. Testers loved it in bumps and short-radius turns, especially, but they warned that it gets knocked around some in crud. “Slingshot turn finishes and nimble quickness; a high-energy ski,” said Gleason.

Nordica Nemesis 2011

Nordica Nemesis (2011)

Nordica took last year’s burly, damp Nemesis and lightened it up, replacing the two sheets of metal with carbon to make it significantly easier to handle. One thing hasn’t changed: It’s still an aggressive charger with a more demanding feel. Pro: It carves cleanly on hardpack, making it one of the more multitalented skis in the category. Con: It doesn’t have the buttery smooth feel of some of the powder purists in the category, and it requires a skilled, powerful driver. (It scored last among winners in Forgiveness.) “Solid at speed and holds a nice edge,” said Humes. “This is definitely a ski for an aggressive woman.”

2011 Blizzard The Answer

Blizzard The Answer (2011)

The Answer is a rockered big-mountain twin-tip that’s as lively as a fat ski can get (No. 1 in Rebound) thanks to the subtleness of its rocker profile. In deep powder, some testers wished they had the 191-cm length for extra float, but the 184 was zippy in crud and pleasingly energetic on the groomed. The Answer comes with Blizzard’s Slider binding interface, which accepts any binding, dismounts in seconds (so you can swap in another Slider-mounted binding), and allows the ski to flex roundly fore and aft of its single mounting screw directly underfoot. “A versatile, all-around performer,” said Malone.

2011 Elan Spire

Elan Spire (2011)

As the fattest ski in the category, the Spire was at a disadvantage in terms of quickness and hard-snow grip, but it held its own nevertheless. It’s fluid, supple, strong and surprisingly agreeable in bumps. And with that 98-mm waist, no one doubts its powder-day capabilities—especially with its touch of tip rocker. Flotation won’t be a problem. Aside from the rocker and width, it’s the same as the Apex (see No. 13), which testers liked for all-mountain, all-conditions applications. But if you ski lots of powder, the Spire will satisfy. “Easygoing, balanced, round and smooth in longer turns,” said Casey.

2011 Rossignol S6

Rossignol S6 Jib (2011)

Yes, it’s part of Rossi’s “jib” collection, and yes, it’s a full twin-tip, but the sensibly priced S6 impressed testers (most of whom never ski backward—at least on purpose) with its combination of powder-day surfiness and everyday skiability. This year’s version is rockered tip-to-tail, so it has a pleasing, buttery feel in soft snow. But its rocker and sidecut work together to lay a nice long edge on hardpack. You have to be patient, but it’ll carve. Testers clearly preferred Rossi’s S7 (p. 69) for pure powder applications, but the S6 offers more all-mountain versatility. “Best in deep snow, but handles all surfaces nicely,” said Garrett.

2011 K2 Sidestash

K2 Sidestash (2011)

The tip and tail notches are for climbing skins—not required, but you get the idea. The Sidestash is built for adventure in the kind of snow you might find beyond the ropes, with or without a short-to-medium hike. Rockered in the forebody and traditionally cambered underfoot, it tolerates hardpack, but greatly prefers soft snow and deep powder. If your snow is typically somewhere in between the two, you’re in luck: Testers ranked the Sidestash No. 2 in Crud. More important: It ranks among the top three in Overall Impression. “Blends big-ski float with user-friendly agility; surprisingly forgiving.” said Gleason.