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Power Your Steering: Intermediate Skiers

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Your shoulders should face the fall line, even as your skis remain perpendicular to it. This keeps flailing arms and poles — usually the first…

Your shoulders should face the fall line, even as your skis remain perpendicular to it. This keeps flailing arms and poles — usually the first dominoes in a chain of problems — from complicating your turn.
INCORRECT (right): The farther you twist away from the fall line at the end of one turn, the farther you’ll have to twist in the other direction to start a new one. Your arms and poles will swing, directing energy up the hill or out to your sides.

In the top portion of a turn, let gravity start the work of passively turning your skis into the fall line. Then, use your feet and legs as your…

In the top portion of a turn, let gravity start the work of passively turning your skis into the fall line. Then, use your feet and legs as your primary, active steering mechanisms.
INCORRECT (right): Steering your whole body — rather than just your legs — toward the fall line requires twice the energy and shifts too much weight to your inside leg, causing your skis to separate.

Resist the temptation to torque your upper body by keeping your arms steady, as if you're holding on to a fixed point in front of you. On more…

Resist the temptation to torque your upper body by keeping your arms steady, as if you’re holding on to a fixed point in front of you. On more advanced terrain, this will support effective pole action.
INCORRECT (right): The more remote the turning force is from your skis, the less efficient your turn. It takes so long for the rotary message to travel down your body from your shoulders that your skis skid aimlessly into the fall line.

Prepare for the next turn by directing your torso, and therefore your energy, down the hill, not across it. If you need to scrub speed, twist your…

Prepare for the next turn by directing your torso, and therefore your energy, down the hill, not across it. If you need to scrub speed, twist your legs to steer your skis out of the fall line.
INCORRECT (right): At the mercy of your overrotating shoulders, your skis will continue skidding and will eventually wash out at the end of your turn. By now, it’s almost impossible for your legs to regain control of your steering.