Rossignol Avenger 82 Ti (2011)

In a category of race-bred Type A carvers, the Avenger isn’t afraid to let its fun, playful side show, and testers universally loved it for that. Talk about balance of skills: The Avenger earned the top mark in only one criterion, but was so strong across the board that it earned the No. 1 ranking overall. That one criterion? Forgiveness. Sure, it’s a race-ready, wood-core construction with two sheets of metal and stout sidewalls, but it never forgets that skiing is supposed to be enjoyable. “Easy, smooth, creamy feel,” said Preston. “An all-around winner.”
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on
2011 Rossignol Avenger 85Ti

Rating: / 5
Price: $1000.00
Year: 2011
Level: 2
Gender: Male
Waist Width:
Tip/Tail/Waist: 126/82/112
Lengths: 177

Stability at speed: 3.68 / 5
Hard snow performance: 3.69 / 5
Crud performance: 3.23 / 5
Forgiveness: 3.65 / 5

Related

rossignol aven 82 Ti thumb

Rossignol Avenger 82 TI (2010)

Category: Men's Cruiser; Category ranking: No. 3 (tie); Average score: 3.31; Balance of skills: 3.37; Best for: All-terrain versatility, emphasis on groomers; Not for: Highly technical short-turn carving

Dynastar Legend Sultan 85

Dynastar Legend Sultan 85 (2011)

High marks across the board speak to the Sultan 85’s balance of skills. It’s an ideal intro-to-rocker ski for the traditionalist. A touch of early rise—starting about 18 cm back from the tip of the ski—gives it smoothness and flow in powder and crud. But bomber construction—vertical sidewalls, wood core, two sheets of metal—and traditional camber along the majority of its length give it the snap and rebound that some all-mountain experts still prefer. It’s solid and fluid, quiet on the snow but never lifeless. “A solid ski for solid skiers,” said Preston.

rossignol avenger carbon thumb

Rossignol Avenger 82 Carbon (2010)

Category: Men's Intermediate; Category ranking: No. 6; Average score: 3.14; Balance of skills: 3.09; Best for: Everyday versatility; an intro to powder; Not for: Learning to trust edges on hard snow

2011 Rosignol S86W Freeski

Rossignol S86W Freeski (2011)

Rossignol’s S86 ranked No. 1 in the Men’s Mixed Snow category (see p. 73). The women’s version is, thankfully, not watered down: Vertical sidewalls, two sheets of metal and a full wood core give it plenty of hard-snow integrity. Meanwhile, a rockered tip and tail ease through crud and bumps like water running downhill. (It scored No. 3 in Forgiveness.) Testers agreed that the S86W suited the category perfectly: a Jill of all trades that scored highly in every criterion, but didn’t stand out in any one. A very versatile ski for all levels. “Super fun and smooth,” said Gillet. “You could really take them anywhere.”

2011 Rossignol S7

Rossignol S7 (2011)

Think you’re not a very good powder skier? Don’t decide till you try the category-crushing S7. There’s nothing special about the construction: A sheet of Titanal gives it just enough power and dampness; 30-degree sidewalls take a beating. The secret’s in the shape. Traditional camber and sidecut underfoot provide a comfy home base. Tip and tail are rockered and reverse-sidecut. The tip is smeary, floaty, undemanding; the tail sinks readily when you need to dump speed. The S7—No. 1 in six criteria—forgives almost any mistake; and we tested the 195 cm. Ski as aggressively as you dare; it bails you out every time. “The ultimate powder tool,” said Preston.

Rosignol S86

Rossignol S86 Freeride (2011)

Rossignol had a great test this year, and here’s the poster child of the Rooster’s fully fledged return to relevance. The S86 is an accomplished generalist. Sidecut and traditional camber underfoot combined with a wood-core, metal-reinforced construction make it surefooted on hard snow. But rocker and reverse camber tip-and-tail make it fun and easy in powder, crud, even bumps. It pivots, skids, smears, carves—whatever is asked of it—making it a great choice for anything but the deepest powder or hardest ice. “Hungry for fun in all conditions, especially crud and bumps,” said Scholey.

Rosignol S86

Rossignol S86 Freeride (2011)

Rossignol had a great test this year, and here’s the poster child of the Rooster’s fully fledged return to relevance. The S86 is an accomplished generalist. Sidecut and traditional camber underfoot combined with a wood-core, metal-reinforced construction make it surefooted on hard snow. But rocker and reverse camber tip-and-tail make it fun and easy in powder, crud, even bumps. It pivots, skids, smears, carves—whatever is asked of it—making it a great choice for anything but the deepest powder or hardest ice. “Hungry for fun in all conditions, especially crud and bumps,” said Scholey.

Volkl Kendo

Volkl Kendo (2011)

The Kendo, frankly, sparked disagreement. It’s a narrower version of the highly decorated Mantra (see No. 13). Kendo means “way of the knife,” and with a sturdy, race-ready construction and two sheets of metal, that’s an apt image for its performance on groomed. Its lightness surprised us, and there was consensus regarding its Quickness (No. 2). But some testers saw it as a burly carver most at home on hardpack; others enjoyed it more in bumps and crud. One of our pickiest testers was its biggest proponent. “Rips the heck out of the hill in every facet: pow, crud, bumps, carving,” said Elling.