Rossignol Radical WC 130 (2011)

The WC 130 is identical to the Lange RS 130, and the co-owned French brands make little secret of the fact that their boots are co-developed—different only in paint and minor details. The WC 130 is every bit as successful in design, as capable in all-mountain terrain, as refined in its balance of no-compromise performance and reasonable all-day comfort. Note: It’s $110 cheaper.
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Radical WC 130

Rating: 0.00 / 5
Price: $650.00
Year: 2011
Level: N/A
Gender: Male

Toebox fit: 0.00 / 5
Forefoot fit: 0.00 / 5
Ankle fit: 0.00 / 5
Instep fit: 0.00 / 5
Adjustments: 0.00 / 5
Closure: 0.00 / 5
Response: 0.00 / 5
Support: 0.00 / 5
Flex: 0.00 / 5
Steering: 0.00 / 5
Comfort: 0.00 / 5
Average Score: 0.00 / 5

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