Rossignol Sensor 80 (2011)

The lower shell is roomy and lacks fit tension. That’s good for comfort but usually bad for responsiveness. But Rossignol gives the Synergy 80 a snug upper cuff, so lateral quickness is pretty good for a boot this comfortable. It’s still not exactly dynamic, but its upright stance will keep intermediates balanced, and with its soft flex, it’s a natural in bumps
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Rossignol Synergy Sensor 80

Rating: 0.00 / 5
Price: $475.00
Year: 2011
Level: N/A
Gender: Male

Toebox fit: 0.00 / 5
Forefoot fit: 0.00 / 5
Ankle fit: 0.00 / 5
Instep fit: 0.00 / 5
Adjustments: 0.00 / 5
Closure: 0.00 / 5
Response: 0.00 / 5
Support: 0.00 / 5
Flex: 0.00 / 5
Steering: 0.00 / 5
Comfort: 0.00 / 5
Average Score: 0.00 / 5

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Vita sensor 80

Rossignol Vita Sensor 80 (2011)

Our women liked the Vita slightly more than the pricier Electra Sensor3 90 (see previous). Must be a comfort thing. The Vita is roomier than the Electra, but it’s equally well balanced, the liner is every bit as well designed, constructed and married to its shell, and the more relaxed flex is still enough to power a ski. As one tester put it: “a bedroom slipper with some zest.”

Rossignol Electra Sensor3 80

Rossignol Electra Sensor3 80 (2011)

A slight softening of flex makes the Electra 80 a bit less powerful than the 90 (below), but it’s a better choice for intermediates or lighter experts. Otherwise, it’s a carbon copy of the 90. Both have rubbery Vibram soles that make parking lots and base lodge staircases easier to navigate, and both have quilted fleece-fur liners that ski accurately while keeping the cold out.

Rossignol 110 Zenith Sensor3

Rossignol Zenith Sensor3 110 (2011)

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Rossignol Electra Sensor3 90 (2011)

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Radical WC 130

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Lange Blaster Pro

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The Blaster stands out in a category of mostly intermediate boots. It’s comfortable but designed for experts. The walk feature, which allows the cuff to release upright, is intended for easier hiking and touring out of bounds, but it’s fine around the base area, too, and there’s little compromise of rearward stiffness. The foot-wrap and lateral quickness are excellent.

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