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School of Rocker, Page 2

It’s here to stay, and it’s not just for powder skis anymore. Manufacturers are offering new hybrids that’ll help anyone—anyone—ski better.

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Ski Rocker Profiles

First, the basics. Rocker is the opposite of camber. A fully rockered ski bends upward fore and aft of the binding, like a water ski. That helps a ski to plane in powder and gives the ride a looser, surfier feel.
Cool, but there’s a trade-off. Too much rocker, and you lose power at the end of the turn when you’re really getting after it or hoping to move laterally across the fall line.
It could feel mushy. (Then again, mushy isn’t so bad when you’re going 50 mph in pow and want to dump a little speed without hooking up into a high-g giant-slalom turn. But really, how many of us are skiing huge lines in Alaska with the cameras rolling?)
In crud, rocker smooths the ride. When the pressured tip of a cambered ski hits a pile of snow, it slams hard and pops you into the air. With a rockered shovel, the impact is more gradual, less abrupt.

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