Gear

Seirus HeatTouch Hellfire Mitt

Those with chronically cold hands and fingers will ski longer and far more comfortably with these heated mittens and gloves.


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Keep fingers warm for hours in any conditions with the HeatTouch Hellfire heated glove or mitt.
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Seirus HeatTouch Hellfire, MSRP, $450  [MITT: BUY NOW]  [GLOVE – BUY NOW]

SKI Gear 360 Review

If you’re like me and love everything about skiing except for the cold hands, you have finally met your favorite new piece of gear. Like many women, my extremities run cold even in typically winter temperatures, and no matter how many styles of gloves or mittens I try, and no matter what the insulation is, I’ve been unable to find a piece of handwear that consistently keeps my digits warm and dry during bell-to-bell skiing. Then I met the Seirus HeatTouch Hellfire series and I can say with confidence that I’m never going back.

I tested the Hellfire Mitt, because I prefer mittens in general, but the technology is the same for the mitt and the glove. Seirus employs its Flexible Fusion heat panel to effectively heat the entire glove back and fingers. There are three settings: Low, which keeps heat for 12 hours; Medium, lasting about eight hours; and High, providing heat for up to four hours. The shell of the mitt is leather and softshell, with a burly insulation made from 280-gram Heatlock, which is Seirus’ proprietary synthetic insulator technology. Which is to say, even without the heating element, this is a substantial mitt or glove that will keep hands warm in moderate to cold temperature Two ultra-slim lithium batteries per glove (four total) provide the heat and are conveniently stored in the gauntlets. It does make the already bulky mitt heavier than most, but I was pleasantly surprised by how I didn’t notice the added weight while I was out on the slopes.

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Two ultra-slim lithium batteries are stored in the gauntlet of the HeatTouch Hellfire , offering up to 12 hours of heat on the lowest setting.Courtesy of Seirus

I wore the mitts during a few ski days in typical Colorado early-season conditions. Early-morning temps were cold: around 8 degrees F. I set the heat to Medium, which kept my hands comfortable while lapping the only two lifts open at Arapahoe Basin at the time. By lunch, temperatures had risen to the high teens, so I switched the heat to Low, which kept my hand perfectly warm for the remainder of the day. On another outing, the temperatures ranged from 15 to 30 degrees F, and the lowest heat setting got the job done. I look forward to giving these a go in truly frigid temps—the ones where I’d normally stash some disposable hand heaters in my pockets, but won’t need to any longer.

It’s worth mentioning, but is not surprising, that a glove that provides this level of warmth is going to sacrifice dexterity. You will need to remove these to do most things requiring use of your fingers, like zip your coat, clasp your helmet, or retrieve a snack from your pocket. The Hellfire mitt and glove do have an inner liner, but it’s not removable. For me, this is an expected and small price to pay for true, all-day warmth.

Finally, while these are not inexpensive, it’s an investment in your overall comfort on the slopes, like heated boots or photochromic goggles. As far as value for your buck, the Hellfire feels incredibly durable, thanks in part to the beefiness but also to the waterproof premium leather and bulletproof ToughTek palm. I might be only three wears in, but I do appreciate the provided storage pouch and battery stash pockets that keep everything in one convenient place. If cold hands consistently plague you on the slopes, these are a solid choice that will keep you skiing longer each time you go out.