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Brands

Apparel

Never Get Cold Again

The gear you need to stay toasty on the slopes and in the village this winter.

Never Get Cold Again

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Arc’teryx Firebee AR Parka
We love a down coat that’s truly rugged enough for skiing in tight trees. Arc’teryx paired the durability of Gore Thermium with the convenience of lightweight, extremely warm 850-fill European goose down, creating the perfect puffy for the most hardcore (and cold) skiers. The Firebee boasts an extra-tall collar for full protection, and it’s helmet-compatible thanks to Arc’s fully insulated StormHood, so there’s no excuse for having the shivers in this coat, no matter the weather. $949

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Bogs Snowpocolypse Boots
If you want to get serious about staying warm, start low and start here. The Bogs Snowpocolypse boots don’t mess around. They’re fully waterproof, lined with 1,000-g Thinsulate, and fitted with a 10-mm wool-blend footbed to keep frigid temperatures at bay. All that works together for a boot that stomps out the cold and is rated to, oh, 112 degrees below zero. The Snowpocolypse weighs in at about six pounds per pair, so wearers also get the unintended benefit of a lower-body workout. $300

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Canada Goose Snow Mantra Parka
Tagged as “the warmest coat on Earth” by Canada Goose, the Arctic-strength Snow Mantra Parka will get the job done on the coldest of days. Plumped with 675-fill-power white goose down, the thigh-length coat has all the bells and whistles, from a storm flap for the zipper and fleece-lined hand-warmer pockets to a high-pile windguard layer and a three-way adjustable tunnel hood. There’s even an ID window on the left chest pocket in case you’d rather not verbally introduce yourself to the scientist arriving to relieve you at your North Pole research outpost. $1,500

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DryGuy Boot Glove
Here’s an easy and inexpensive way to fight frozen feet. It’s the same concept as layering your ski clothes, but instead you’re layering your ski boots with a flexible heat shield for your feet. The durable neoprene bootie slips on and off as needed and doesn’t affect boot performance. And the price doesn’t affect your winter budget. $30

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Grabber Hand Warmers
These little guys should be a staple in your ski pack, especially if you’re prone to frozen digits. Sold at most grocery stores and gas stations in ski country, Grabbers are a simple and reliable solution to an extra-cold day on the slopes. Open, shake for heat, place inside your gloves, and enjoy a few hours of simple, inexpensive warmth. $1–$5

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Lenz Heat Sock 1.0
Step into the future with socks that are both battery heated and, yes, Bluetooth compatible. Plug ’em in and turn ’em on. Lenz’s lithium-powered socks will keep your toes toasty for up to 14 hours, and they’re comfortable, with merino-wool construction. The slim battery pack at the top of the knee-length sock remains far away from your ski boot. You can choose from three heat settings directly on the sock or through an app on your smartphone. Hello? Your metatarsals are calling, and they say thanks a bunch. $300

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Marmot Women’s Cheeky Pant
Marmot understands that a key step in fighting the cold is to keep your butt warm. The inspired women’s Cheeky Pant features removable insulated shorts that easily zip in for low-profile layering and instant warmth. Don’t be deceived: These are high-performance backcountry-ready pants with three-layer Gore-Tex construction, Recco technology, articulated knees, leg vents, and a Cordura scuff guard. $450

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Mountain Hardware Dynotherm Dome
Add a beanie under your helmet and your whole body will reap the warm benefits. The Dynotherm Dome is thin enough to comfortably wear under your helmet but thick enough to keep your noggin warm in freezing temperatures. Filled with Thermal.Q Elite, a synthetic insulation, this cap is a lightweight sleeping bag for your head. $40

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Outdoor Research Capstone Heated Gloves
We’ll leave the cardiological discussion for another day, but the “cold hands, warm heart” thing won’t do squat for you on snow. There’s no argument that warm hands are a must for a happy day. The Capstone will heat up your hands—and probably warm up your attitude as well. OR’s R&D geeks have the Capstone producing twice the heat of its sister model, the Lucent, boasting a more intense “heat density,” in lab lingo. The Capstone’s long battery life (up to eight hours) covers you nicely bell to bell. $500

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Patagonia Merino Air Hoody and Bottoms
Although it’s one of Patagonia’s lightest baselayers, the Merino Air Hoody blends fine merino wool with Patagonia’s signature Capilene fiber to ensure that you’ll stay warm and dry all day. Plus, the fabric is super soft, extra stretchy, and breathable, with seamless construction, so no need to worry about bunching or a funky fit. Merino Air Bottoms apply the same technology to your lower half. Hoody, $149; bottoms, $129

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Ravean Heated Jacket
You think your cell phone is smart? Just wait until you slip into your self-heating smarty pants—or into the warm embrace of your intelligent coat. The Ravean Heated Down Jacket has heated panels, and heated gloves plug right into the coat. It can also charge your poor ol’ cell phone. And stay tuned for the next generation: clothing that monitors your physiology and adjusts heating and cooling on the move. $230

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Seirus Heat Touch Torche Mitt
Not news: Mittens are warmer than gloves. Doubling down on that fact, Seirus launched its Heat Touch Torche Component Mitt. It’s a three-in-oner. The removable heated (glove) liner is a standalone, as is the outer mitten. Team up the two, and your hands will enjoy the heat of a thousand suns. Or enough to laugh at the cold. $395

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Sorel Joan of Arctic Shearling Boot
If you’re a longtime skier, you probably grew up wearing Sorels. The venerable boot brand has kept skiers’ feet warm and dry since the ’60s. This season Sorel has revamped its classic Joan of Arctic women’s boot. Don’t judge it by its (awfully cute) looks; the Shearling is a working boot. It’s rated to minus 25 degrees, with Sorel’s famed vulcanized rubber shell keeping you on your feet from slushy parking lot to icy condo steps. A waterproof suede upper and a removable felt inner boot are just parts of Sorel’s signature bulletproof construction. $220

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The North Face L3 Down Midlayer
 You heard it from your mom growing up, but we’re here to tell you again: Layering works for staying warm. For instance, the L3 Down Midlayer is a great ultra-lightweight jacket to slide under any outer coat or shell. Filled with sustainably sourced 800-fill goose down, the L3 is also waterproof and extremely durable—constructed with strategically placed micro- and mini-ripstop fabric. On spring days, wear the L3 on its own. $350

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Salomon X Pro Custom Heat
Aftermarket boot heaters have been available for years, but we support the push toward integrated systems, especially for women, who more frequently deal with frozen tootsies. So we say hurray to Salomon’s first heated boot, the X Pro Custom Heat. The liner features the heating element and a rechargeable battery, and a choice of three temperature settings will keep your feet happy for up to 18 hours. $900/$850 women’s