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Slideshow: The Exercises

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LEG PRESSThis is a classic for building strong quads, and it comes as no surprise that it's a prime part of the U.S. Ski Team workout. In addition to…

LEG PRESS

This is a classic for building strong quads, and it comes as no surprise that it’s a prime part of the U.S. Ski Team workout. In addition to the standard two-leg push, experts suggest varying the movement and pace to work a greater range of muscles. Try pushing with two legs and then lowering with one, says Andy Walshe, director of sport science for the team. Other options: Push down and up with one leg, and slow the pace with a count of eight up and eight down.

>Why Do It Strong quads directly translate to strength and stability on the hill. They contribute to form, keeping you forward in your boots, and function, helping you steer and brake.

>Watch Out Be sure that when you adjust the seat, your torso and thighs form a 90-degree angle in the ending position. An angle greater than 90 degrees will stress your knees and increase your chance of injury.

HAMSTRING CURLThere are two versions of the hamstring curl: horizontal (where you're lying facedown) and seated. Trainers say both isolate the…

HAMSTRING CURL

There are two versions of the hamstring curl: horizontal (where you’re lying facedown) and seated. Trainers say both isolate the hamstring equally well.

>Why Do It Strong hamstrings keep your tibia (shinbone) and femur (thighbone) stable, says Bob Toth, head athletic trainer for the University of Utah Ski Team. Without stability, your tibia can shift too far forward, upping your risk of blowing your ACL. Strong hamstrings also decrease general wear and tear on your knee. Last, they help you shape your turns. When you roll and extend into a turn and your leg straightens out, that’s when your hamstring kicks in.

>Watch Out Make sure the pad sits right where your lower leg meets your ankle on the calf side, or you won’t get the proper motion from the machine.

ONE-ARM CABLE ROWThis is an excellent move for strengthening your back and, to a lesser degree, your shoulders and biceps, says Jason Busch, a…

ONE-ARM CABLE ROW

This is an excellent move for strengthening your back and, to a lesser degree, your shoulders and biceps, says Jason Busch, a certified personal trainer, avid skier and owner of Body Balance gym in Boulder, Colo. To do it, sit down and grab a handle with your left hand. Extend your left arm forward, then twist back and to the left, pulling your hand toward your rib cage. Then switch sides.

>Why Do It When you ski, your upper body and skis move independently, and a strong back keeps you stable. By twisting, you also strengthen the obliques and abdominals, which make up your core, Busch says.

>Watch Out To prevent injury, extend your legs but don’t lock your knees. Also keep your back straight, and aim for a 90-degree angle between your torso and thighs.

CHEST PRESSSkiers know they need to work their backs but might forget about the chest, and this machine is the perfect fix. It also strengthens the…

CHEST PRESS

Skiers know they need to work their backs but might forget about the chest, and this machine is the perfect fix. It also strengthens the shoulders and triceps.

>Why Do It A strong chest is important for good posture, a must for staying upright on the hill, says Busch. It’s also vital for an overall well-toned body, especially if you’re strengthening your back. If you work one, you must work the other to help prevent muscle imbalance, which can lead to injury. Shoulders and triceps assist in poling and with pushing yourself up after you fall.

>Watch Out The bar needs to reach your midchest (not higher or lower) to work your chest muscles effectively. Also, keep your back flat, not arched, to avoid excess strain.

ROWING MACHINEWhile experts suggest a variety of cardio equipment to stay in top shape for skiing-everything from the spin bike to the elliptical…

ROWING MACHINE

While experts suggest a variety of cardio equipment to stay in top shape for skiing-everything from the spin bike to the elliptical trainer to the treadmill-the rowing machine is particularly favored as a low-impact, full-body workout.

>Why Do It Cardio is essential for working out at altitude, where the air is thinner and your heart and lungs have to put out more effort to keep you moving. The rowing machine is a good choice because it targets so many parts of the body. You drive through your hips, knees and ankles and finish the row with your arms, Walshe says. It also strengthens your back.

>Watch Out Rowing-machine injuries are rare, but to be safe, don’t arch your back.