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A Skier’s Dictionary

10 made-up terms and phrases every skier should know, including “bootgasm” (the pleasurable relief of removing your ski boots at the end of the day) and “man soup” (five or more guys in a post-ski hot tub). Plus, a few tips on making the most of each term.

Drop jumps thumb

How To: Drop Jumps

This is a great exercise for developing power, which forces the athlete to overcome significant amounts of eccentric forces, while reducing the total number of ground impacts. Do three sets of five jumps for maximum benefit.

Power Through Edging

The Last Plateau: Power Through Edging (Skiing)

Ask 10 people why they turn on skis, and nine will tell you it’s to control speed. They’re not necessarily wrong. Most skiers—even really good ones—turn to thwart the forces pulling them down the mountain. But the best skiers use their turns to generate power. The higher your skis’ edge angles, the tighter an arc they’ll carve. The tighter and more precise the arc, the more momentum you’ll generate throughout your turn. Your power output depends on your ability to keep your skis on edge throughout a turn and to minimize the time you spend on a flat, disengaged ski.

The Alpinist skins stick, glide, and climb in all conditions. And with G3’s signature tip connection system (two metal hooks that rotate to fit all ski tips), you can forget about accidentally kicking ’em off on the uptrack. [$153; genuineguidegear.com]

The Skinny on Skinning

Skinning is crucial in the side- or backcountry because it’s more efficient and less tiring than hiking in deep snow. The fur-like surface of skins flattens as you move uphill, allowing your skis to glide, but it grips to keep you from sliding back after each step.