Ski's 100 Top Instructors

Instruction
Author:
Publish date:
Top Instructors

Want to sharpen your skills? Introduce your wife, your kids, your friends oryour parents to the sport you love? Gain confidence on new terrain or in challenging snow? Book a lesson with one of the instructors on the list that follows. Theseteaching pros have impressed their clients, their ski-school directors and, finally,our panel of expert judges. Now let them impress you.

PSIA demo team

The instructors named to the Professional Ski Instructors of America's Demo Team are the best of the best. To earn the honor, an instructor must both ski and teach flawlessly.

Deb Armstrong

Taos Ski Valley, N.M. 866-968-7386, ext. 1355

Jeb Boyd

Loon Mountain, N.H. 800-229-5666

Andy Docken

Aspen Mountain, Colo. 877-282-7736

Kurt Fehrenbach

Aspen Mountain, Colo. 877-282-7736

Chris Fellows

North American Ski Training Center, Multiple locations 530-582-4772

Katie Fry

Aspen Mountain, Colo. 877-282-7736

Megan Harvey

Aspen Mountain, Colo. 877-282-7736

Nicholas Herrin

Big Sky, Mont. 406-995-5743

Chris Kastner

Crystal Mountain, Wash. 360-663-3030

Dave Lyon

Stevens Pass, Wash. 425-482-3183

Bobby Murphy

Telluride, Colo.800-801-4832

Doug Pierini

Sierra-at-Tahoe, Calif.530-659-7453, ext. 270

Michael Rogan

Heavenly, Calif.775-586-4400

Rob Sogard
Snowbird, Utah801-933-2170

Nelson Wingard
Crystal Mountain, Wash.360-663-3030[NEXT "All-Mountain"]All-Mountain

The instructors below can teach you to handle a wide range of snow and terrain conditions—freeing you to ski the entire mountain with confidence.

Andy Adams
Kirkwood, Calif.209-258-7245

Dave Ayers
Beaver Creek, Colo.970-845-5300

Miguel Bilbao
Bogus Basin, Idaho208-332-5340

Armin Bischofberger
Stratton, Vt.800-787-2886

Wes Cohen
Copper Mountain, Colo.866-416-9875

Jessica Copp
Durango Mountain Resort, Colo.800-525-0892

David Corrow
Sugarloaf/USA, Maine207-237-6924

Bill Cunningham
Cannon Mountain, N.H.603-823-8800

Patty Elliott
Ski Ward, Mass.508-845-1797

Glen Findholt
Smugglers' Notch, Vt.800-451-8752

Ed Gill
Stowe, Vt.800-253-4754

Charlie Howard
Vail, Colo. (Lionshead)800-475-4543

John King
Holiday Valley, N.Y.716-699-2345, ext. 4424

Brad Kreager
Tamarack, Idaho208-325-1030

Gates Lloyd
Breckenridge, Colo.800-576-2754

Rick Lyons
Mount Hood Meadows, Ore.503-337-2222, ext. 229

Lil Pearson
The Balsams, N.H.603-255-3952

Franz Penistan
Snowbird, Utah801-933-2170

Kjell Petersen
Big Mountain, Mont.406-862-2909

Dan Ray
Squaw Valley, Calif.530-581-7263

Brian Righter
Deer Valley, Utah435-645-6648

J.T. Thompson
Winter Park, Colo.800-972-7529

Emily Underkoffler
Mammoth Mountain, Calif.800-626-6684

Troy Walsh
Sunday River, Maine207-824-5080

Steve Woodward
The Canyons, Utah435-615-3449

Richard Wulz
Vail, Colo. (Vail Village)800-475-4543[NEXT "Kids"] Kids


Teaching kids to ski takes a blend of patience, creativity and encouragement—plus a well-developed sense of fun. These instructors turn out enthusiastic new skiers bythe chairload.

Stacey Bengston
Big Mountain, Mont.406-862-2909

John Bruckner
Cannon Mountain, N.H.603-823-8800

Bryan Corbellini
Vail, Colo. (Golden Peak)970-476-3239

Amy Deneen
Silver Mountain, Idaho208-783-1506

Nicki DiMario
Ski Ward, Mass.508-845-1797

Judi Dixon
Ski Sundown, Conn.860-379-7669

Mike Eyers
Sierra-at-Tahoe, Calif.530-659-7453, ext. 270

Phil Haigh
Copper Mountain, Col866-416-9875

Dino Haak
Summit at Snoqualmie, Wash.425-434-6700

Chris Kimble
Telluride, Colo.800-801-4832

Eric Linton
Vail, Colo. (Lionshead)800-475-4543

Ed Martin
Park City, Utah800-222-7275

Roxanne McClure
Mount Hood Meadows, Ore.503-337-2222, ext. 229

Ailen Mezquida
Stratton, Vt.800-787-2886

Patti Olsen
Deer Valley, Utah435-645-6648

Ed Totten
Bogus Basin, Idaho208-332-5340

David Winn
Breckenridge, Colo.800-576-2754[NEXT "Women & Groups"] Women

Guidance from a female instructor can help some women develop confidence and overcome fears in a supportive environment.

Pam Gould
Waterville Valley, N.H.603-236-8311

Debs Herne
Sierra-at-Tahoe, Calif.530-659-7453, ext. 270

Carole Hill
Summit at Snoqualmie, Wash.425-434-6700

Malin Johnsdotter
Vail, Colo. (Vail Village)800-475-4543

Lyn Junor
Squaw Valley, Calif.530-581-7263

Lynda Parker
Winter Park, Colo.800-972-7529

Gale Plunket
Greek Peak, N.Y.607-835-6111

Kristi Robertson
Stowe, Vt.800-253-4754

Lucia Wing
Stratton, Vt.800-787-2886

Groups

Group lessons can foster camaraderie and provide examples of what (and what not) to do on-piste. The specialists below provide outstanding personalized attention in groups.

Paul Berzatzy
Mad River Glen, Vt.802-496-3551, ext. 125

Leigh Clark
Mad River Glen, Vt.802-496-3551, ext. 125

Jeff Cordell
Mount Hood Meadows, Ore.503-337-2222, ext. 229

Neil Leach
Smugglers' Notch, Vt.800-451-8752

Karl Poplawski
Stowe, Vt.800-253-4754

Mark Sperling
Whiteface, N.Y.518-946-2223

Chris Wilson
Vail, Colo. (Lionshead)800-475-4543[NEXT "Specalities"]Bumps

Bumps are one of skiing's long-standing joys—and challenges. The instructors below will have you blazing your own zipper line before you know it.

Dan Beck
Crested Butte, Colo.800-444-9236

Patrick Deneen
Silver Mountain, Idaho208-783-1506

Dan DiPiro
Cannon Mountain, N.H.603-823-8800

Gale Jaeck
Park City, Utah800-222-7275

Gunnar Moberg
Vail, Colo. (Vail Village)800-475-4543

Link Neimark
Big Mountain, Mont.406-862-2909

Powder

Mastering the deep requires specific skills. The instructors below will prepare you for the adventures only powder can provide.

Greg Kelley
Vail, Colo. (Golden Peak)800-475-4543

Jim Moore
Squaw Valley, Calif.530-581-7263

Gary Paolino
Mammoth Mountain, Calif.800-626-6684

New School

It takes an expert to navigate the new school, from twin-tips to big- air. The instructors below will launch your learning curve—in the terrain park and beyond.

Jeremy Graves
Park City, Utah800-222-7275

Jed Haupt
Copper Mountain, Colo.866-416-9875

Racing

Fast and furious are the end results, but the finesse of racing requires assiduous attention to detail. Find expert help with the instructors below.

Matt Erickson
Sunday River, Maine207-824-5080

Jim Okie
Ski Sundown, Conn.860-379-7669

Dolly schaub
Crested Butte, Colo.800-444-9236

Adaptive

Advances in technical aids and specialized instruction have opened the world of skiing to those who live with disabilities. The instructors below have the skills, patience and understanding to unlock the slopes.

Nikola Nemcanin
Vail, Colo. (Golden Peak)800-475-4543

Bruce Roemmich
Steamboat, Colo.800-299-5017[NEXT "MultiDiscipline & Judges"]MultiDiscipline

No need for a specialist if your goal is to be Lord of the Boards. These instructors can hone all of your snowsports skills—whether they involve alpine, telemarking, two planks or one.

Frances Ackerman
Angel Fire, N.M.800-633-7463

Patti Banks
Breckenridge, Colo.800-576-2754

Adam Dimond
Snowbird, Utah801-933-2170

Heather Fielding
The Canyons, Utah435-615-3449

Freddy Grossniklaus
Deer Valley, Utah435-645-6648

Aaron Herne
Kirkwood, Calif.209-258-7245

Yuji Matsuyama
Bogus Basin, Idaho208-332-5340

Alan Ormondroyd
Sugarloaf/USA, Maine207-237-6924

Cabot Thomas
Mammoth Mountain, Calif.800-626-6684

Pat Wild
Crested Butte, Colo.800-444-9236

Judges

John Armstrong
President of PSIA and VP of Human Resources at Mammoth Mountain, Calif.

Stu Campbell
SKI's Instruction Director, former VP of SkierServices at Heavenly, Calif.

Victor Gerdin
former PSIA Alpine Demonstration Team Member.

Maggie Loring
PSIA manual author and PSIA-I Examiner at Snowbird, Utah

November 2005[NEXT "Bump Tip"]

Bump Tip Take charge "Don't wait for the bump to flex your legs for you. Instead, initiate the absorption yourself. Actively flex your ankles, knees and hips (but not your back) to absorb the bump with your legs smoothly and quickly. As you pass over the bump and enter the trough, extend your legs and drive your ski tips back down onto the snow. The faster you return your tips to the snow, the more you'll control your speed. This will keep the bumps from throwing you off balance." -Dan DiPiro, Cannon Mountain, N.H., 603-823-8800

Bump Tip Do the tailhop "Avoid the back seat in bumps by learning to tailhop. A tailhop is a hop-turn in which your ski tips stay in contact with the snow as your skis' tails are displaced. Linked, these turns resemble a windshield-wiper action with your tails. The key is to drive your hips forward toward the balls of your feet as your ankles are extending. Try these turns at the tops of moguls—you'll find you go down the back side in balance while maintaining ski-snow contact, and you'll be ready to take on the next bump." -Miguel Bilbao, Bogus Basin, Idaho, 208-332-5340

Bump Tip Turn on top "When picking out a line to maneuver through the bumps, start your turn on top of each bump. Turning on top of the mogul and skiing across the trough will free your tips and tails and allow you to pivot at the start of your turn. That way, you decide where to turn instead of letting the moguls push you around, which happens all too often. Also, make it a goal to keep your ski tips on the snow at all times. This moves your body to the skis' center and puts you in a balanced stance." -Nicholas Herrin, PSIA Demo Team, Big Sky, Mont., 406-995-5743

Bump Tip Mind your P's and D's "The idea: linked turns through a bump field. The reality: a few hurried turns, followed by a drastic move to stop. The solution: Imagine a line from the top of a bump to the flat spot at the bottom. Now ski a round turn from the top. If you finished your turn teetering on the middle point of the bump, you turned too fast, making a P shape. If you finish at the bottom, with better tactics and timing, you'll make a D." -Gates Lloyd, Breckenridge, Colo., 800-576-2754or one.

Frances Ackerman
Angel Fire, N.M.800-633-7463

Patti Banks
Breckenridge, Colo.800-576-2754

Adam Dimond
Snowbird, Utah801-933-2170

Heather Fielding
The Canyons, Utah435-615-3449

Freddy Grossniklaus
Deer Valley, Utah435-645-6648

Aaron Herne
Kirkwood, Calif.209-258-7245

Yuji Matsuyama
Bogus Basin, Idaho208-332-5340

Alan Ormondroyd
Sugarloaf/USA, Maine207-237-6924

Cabot Thomas
Mammoth Mountain, Calif.800-626-6684

Pat Wild
Crested Butte, Colo.800-444-9236

Judges

John Armstrong
President of PSIA and VP of Human Resources at Mammoth Mountain, Calif.

Stu Campbell
SKI's Instruction Director, former VP of SkierServices at Heavenly, Calif.

Victor Gerdin
former PSIA Alpine Demonstration Team Member.

Maggie Loring
PSIA manual author and PSIA-I Examiner at Snowbird, Utah

November 2005[NEXT "Bump Tip"]

Bump Tip Take charge "Don't wait for the bump to flex your legs for you. Instead, initiate the absorption yourself. Actively flex your ankles, knees and hips (but not your back) to absorb the bump with your legs smoothly and quickly. As you pass over the bump and enter the trough, extend your legs and drive your ski tips back down onto the snow. The faster you return your tips to the snow, the more you'll control your speed. This will keep the bumps from throwing you off balance." -Dan DiPiro, Cannon Mountain, N.H., 603-823-8800

Bump Tip Do the tailhop "Avoid the back seat in bumps by learning to tailhop. A tailhop is a hop-turn in which your ski tips stay in contact with the snow as your skis' tails are displaced. Linked, these turns resemble a windshield-wiper action with your tails. The key is to drive your hips forward toward the balls of your feet as your ankles are extending. Try these turns at the tops of moguls—you'll find you go down the back side in balance while maintaining ski-snow contact, and you'll be ready to take on the next bump." -Miguel Bilbao, Bogus Basin, Idaho, 208-332-5340

Bump Tip Turn on top "When picking out a line to maneuver through the bumps, start your turn on top of each bump. Turning on top of the mogul and skiing across the trough will free your tips and tails and allow you to pivot at the start of your turn. That way, you decide where to turn instead of letting the moguls push you around, which happens all too often. Also, make it a goal to keep your ski tips on the snow at all times. This moves your body to the skis' center and puts you in a balanced stance." -Nicholas Herrin, PSIA Demo Team, Big Sky, Mont., 406-995-5743

Bump Tip Mind your P's and D's "The idea: linked turns through a bump field. The reality: a few hurried turns, followed by a drastic move to stop. The solution: Imagine a line from the top of a bump to the flat spot at the bottom. Now ski a round turn from the top. If you finished your turn teetering on the middle point of the bump, you turned too fast, making a P shape. If you finish at the bottom, with better tactics and timing, you'll make a D." -Gates Lloyd, Breckenridge, Colo., 800-576-2754

Related