Bode Miller Signs with US Ski Team

The Olympic and World Cup champ has reinstated his annual contract with the US Ski Team.
Author:
Publish date:
Bode Miller Withdraws

Bode Miller won’t be pursuing tennis any longer. The almost 33-year-old skier has signed and submitted an annual team contract with the US Ski Team. After a two-year breakaway from the team, Bode’s back, and he’s poised for success.

Miller made headlines earlier this year when he stepped onto a tennis court. His bout with the sport was brief—after losing his first match in the U.S. Open qualifier in Honolulu, it was apparent that his high-speed, risk-taking style didn’t mesh well with the age-old game. It’s OK, though, because after bringing home a gold, silver, and bronze medal at Vancouver, it’s clear that Bode’s still got it on the ski hill.

According to multiple sources, Bode’s “jazzed” about his return to skiing. His strong performance in Vancouver shows that he’s ready for another successful season. After 32 wins on the World Cup circuit last year, Miller’s experience is proving valuable. He’s stronger and more practiced than a lot of his competition.

According to the AP story, Miller said,  "I'm taking more risk than everyone else," after failing to finish his first run in the giant slalom at the Olympics, when his attacking nature cost him. "I am willing to deal with the consequences, when a lot of guys aren't willing to deal with those consequences, so they don't take the risk."

He’ll be rejoining  a team comprised of old-schoolers like Ted Ligety, Marco Sullivan, and Erik Fisher. Some new guys— Thomas Biesemeyer, Nolan Kasper and Will Gregorak— have joined them as well .

Bode’s spending much of the summer with his young daughter, enjoying the sun in San Diego. He may spend some time in August at a New Zealand training camp.

Related

Vancouver Bound

Olympics 2010: Ski Cross

The freeskiers who invented it don’t have to like it, but skiercross—make that ‘ski cross’—is now an official, FIS-controlled Olympic event, and former World Cup racers like Daron Rahlves are among the favorites. Burning questions remain, like how baggy should your clothes be, what exactly are the rules, and who’ll win the first gold medal.

Bode

The Truth: Bode Miller

In 2005, Miller won the overall World Cup title. Since then, the outspoken racer has been embroiled in controversy and has gone independent. Here's why.