Inbounds: Back Bowls

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Inbounds: Back Bowls

How To Ski It

These wide-open, often ungroomed snowfields are a good introduction to out-of-bounds skiing because they look and feel a lot like backcountry terrain - especially after a big storm - but they're accessible via chairlift or snowcat.  And because they're within the resort's boundaries, ski patrol marks hazards and does avalanche-control work. You'll experience un-groomed snow and have more freedom to choose your lines than you do on the narrowly cut and manicured trails of the front side. Your best tool here is a blended short turn that combines edging, steering, and aggressive pole action.

Get On Track

Bowls are often served by a single lift, from which you might have to traverse, sidestep, or hike to reach your line. Find a track that's been cut by others and that allows you to glide forward a few feet after each step. If you need to pass other skiers, try not to come upon them suddenly: Quietly let them know you're there. If faster climbers are nipping at your heels, step to the side of the track and let them pass.

[ Tip ] While sidestepping, grip your uphill pole on the shaft, below the grip, so both hands are at the same level. Better yet, buy a pair of telescoping poles that you can adjust as needed.

What To Take

Where To Find It


Back East_ TOUt

Back East

All Stuck up on her Rocky Mountain Vistas and Sierra Snowpack, yet vaguely unfulfilled, a Massachusetts girl ventures back to her roots for a reality check. Face-shredding tree lines, short runs, bitter cold, and unvanquishable Eastern stoke? The perfect antidote to western ennui.

Arc'teryx Silo 18

Inbounds: Back Bowls—What To Take

The back bowls are a good place to practice out-of-bounds ski and expedition techniques, which include skiing with a pack and knowing how to self arrest. (To learn how, visit But keep your aggro attitude in check. Don't be the guy lugging a 40-pound expedition pack around the mountain. As always, carry only what you need.