Mammoth Closes after 270 day season - Ski Mag

Mammoth Closes After 270-Day Season

The snow gods clocked in some overtime as Mammoth Mountain really lived up to its name this season.
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After spending nearly three-quarters of the year buried in snow and open for shredding, Mammoth Mountain will finally succumb to summer on August 6, which certainly constitutes one serious ski season by any measure. 

In addition to ski days, another key measure is the estimated 800 inches of snowfall that rocked Mammoth this winter, its second snowiest season ever—with the record breaker going to its 2010-11 season.

The month of January 2017 did break a record, though—and set the bar high for future snowiest-month-ever award winners. Over twenty feet of snow fell in January, so much that Mammoth had to call in the National Guard to lend a hand.

A Mammoth skiers throws around some late summer snow in the resort's second-longest season in history.

A Mammoth skiers throws around some late summer snow in the resort's second-longest season in history.

Pretty unsurprisingly, Mammoth boasted the longest ski season in Cali this year, and is one of only two resorts still open in the nation – the other being Oregon's Timberline, which happily sits on top of a glacier.

The August closing allows skiers to combine three favorite topics: snow, beer and tunes, with The Mammoth Festival of Beers and Bluesapalooza scheduled that weekend. 

And not to worry, Mammothites—although your mountain is closing soon, it's scheduled to reopen on November 9, which is, ahem, only 100 days away. 

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