Back Talk - March/April 2000 - Ski Mag

Back Talk - March/April 2000

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OH, CANADA...

I would like to congratulate you on the "Hot Dog Redux" article in the December 1999 issue of Skiing, where you gave wonderful credit to Canadian skiers for their development of freestyle skiing. The American press often fails to give credit to the accomplishments of non-Americans. Thank you for the honorable mention.

Carole Dastous

Calgary, Alberta

Let's face it: The skiing is cheaper, the snow is great, and J.P. Auclair is just cute as a button. Canada rocks.-Ed.

MOVING ON
Your recent article "Safe Harbor," January 2000 regarding Schweitzer and Sandpoint, Idaho, was misguided and presented an inaccurate overall picture of both the mountain and the Sandpoint community in which I live.

While it is easy to pick out a handful of radical extremists who live in the region, Mr. Rember should instead have focused on the thousands of people who are part of Schweitzer's appeal. Schweitzer is a place where the locals welcome the opportunity to show a newcomer the secret stashes that exist all over this mountain and throughout the town. I believe that this warmth and friendliness are what guests have come to love about our mountain and town, and why this year nearly 14,000 people bought season passes here.

Schweitzer, like many mountains, fell on some hard times for a variety of reasons. We have moved past it and are excited about the mountain's future. I would suggest that next time you send a writer to cover Schweitzer or any mountain, focus on its present and future instead of dwelling on its past.
Tom Fortune
General Manager,
Schweitzer Mountain

As quoted from Neil Diamond's The Jazz Singer, "How do you know where you're going if you don't know where you've come from?"-Ed.

JUICE BOX
I just finished reading your December issue and was surprised to see the "Juice Gaffe" on page 56. You nailed me for hating winter. Let me clarify a bit: I love skiing, I dislike the cold. I disliked it when I had to sleep in my car during the early days of Nantucket Nectars.I dislike it now because juice sales slow considerably in the colder months. Now, you can switch to Mr. Pibb if you want, but you may want to keep reading our bottlecaps. We just put one into production that says: Tom Scott Surfs in the Summer and Skis in the Winter.
Tom Scott
Co-Founder, Nantucket Nectars

Your sales are safe with us, Tom. See you on the slopes.-Ed.

UNLUCKY NUMBER 7
Hey y'all, you published a sick photo of Brian Swinson doing a double back flip off that cliff at the Snowbird Freeskiing Competition "Hot Dog Redux," December 1999, but credited it to Sebastian Michaud. You've got to give the kid props; he even outdid Sebastian when it came to aerials that day. Thanks for the great issue anyway. You know Brian would never say anything.
John Keegan
Peak Exposure, LLC
IFSA Competitor

Brian (who was #7 that season) absolutely deserves the credit. Sorry about the mix-up.-Ed.

IN WITH THE NEW
Just bought the December 1999 issue and loved all the articles on new school skiing. I'm not dissing, but I just have to set the record straight. We who call Anthony Lakes home have been ripping it up new school style since 1984. Blasting huge air and inventing new tricks is the only way to have fun. That said, much respect goes to all the men and women who are injecting the sport with some seriously badass style. Keep tearing it up y'all!
Dave Zartman
La Grande, Oregon

OUT WITH THE OLD
Please give freeskiing a break! You allow those idiots to feel as if they are helping, even enhancing, the skiing world. In your "Squawllywood" article December 1999, you forgot to mention that in that long line to go up KT-22, those freeskiers with their Red Bull helmets and wide, wimpy skis were fighting, using foul words, smoking, and spitting chewing tobacco all over the place. Those jerks are disrespectful to the skiing public. As forhane's letter in "Back Talk," give him that big spread, but don't forget to add his ski racing accomplishments. Please get back to the purity of the sport.
John Walsh
Lake Tahoe, California

Our sport is expanding, friend, and there is room for all.-Ed.

I LOVE JONNY
In his article titled "Squawllywood," December, 1999, Steve Casimiro depicts Squaw as some kind of Hollywood movie set where the skiers are so high profile in their abilities and appearance that even a skier the caliber of Jonny Moseley goes unnoticed and must wait in the lift line.For Mr. Casimiro's information, although you do get some great skiers at Squaw Valley, the vast majority of the general ski population is much the same as at any other mountain. And in regards to Jonny Moseley being depicted as just another face in the crowd, you should know that shortly after winning his gold medal, Jonny was honored at Squaw with a lifetime season pass and had a trail named after him. Hardly just another face in the crowd. So tell Mr. Casimiro to come and join us on KT-22-he'll fit in just fine.
Christopher C. Capezuto
San Francisco, California

If you, too, worship Jonny, check out: www.members.tripod.com/moseleyfan/links.html

QUESTIONING SEXUALITY
I just received my January 2000 issue of Skiing. I am 48 years old, have been skiing for 33 years, and have an 11-year-old daughter. Do you really think I buy your magazine to read about prostitution?
Gary Spezia
via the Internet

Is this a trick question?-Ed.

HEATHEN
Josh, is your column for real, or is it supposed to be a parody? Hopefully you're joking on the biomechanics of canting and alignment of the skier's foot Ask Josh, October 1999. While I agree that an adjustable-cant feature on the binding might be going too far, boots with a cant adjustment in the shaft have been around for years. Also, if done correctly, grinding the boot sole or placing a cant under the binding can correct a serious problem and allow a skier to be as good as he or she can be.
Kevin Dielissen
Squaw Valley, California

The adjustable-cant device you have on your boot is technically not a canting device as Josh describes it, but rather a fitting tool that aligns the angle of your lower leg with the boot shaft. True canting adjusts the position of the sole of the foot to the ski and can be invaluable in improving technique. The point Josh makes is that even if a cantable binding worked, it may not be practical for binding manufacturers to implement in large-scale production.-Ed.

PRIME TIME WHINE
I just read your comparison of the Dynastar infomercial to those of the Rocketchef, Body by Jake's "Ab Rocker," and the GLH Hair System Formula Number Nine in the November issue of Skiing. I'm amazed at your myopic view of Dynastar's efforts and wonder if you are even remotely aware of the proliferation of infomercial use by such prestigious companies as BMW, General Motors, and a long list of others. I challenge you to educate yourself about the far-reaching impact that Dynastar's effort might have. Anybody can mock what they don't understand. Some dare to break out of the mold and learn new things. Which one are you?
Adam Anthony
CEO, Prime Time Sports TV

We thought long and hard about your question and have taken serious steps toward becoming the latter. For the holidays, we got the entire office on a Thighmaster training program and are happily chewing away on some beef jerky we cooked up in the Ronco Food Dehydrator (it's nearly fat free!).-Ed.

WE AIN'T WHISTLIN' DIXIE
Thank you for your excellent magazine. Just one correction: Your article on Snowshoe Mountain Resort, West Virginia, is entitled "Confederate Ski Village" East, January 2000. In fact, the State of West Virginia never was in the Confederacy.West Virginia was formed by Americans who refused to join with their lowland compatriots in seceding from the Union. West Virginians have more of a skiing bond with the peoples of New Hampshire or Vermont than lowland skiing peoples of Virginia or North Carolina.
Robert Allen
West Virginia

Just testing you, of course.-Ed.

Correction
In the photo accompanying our review of the Booster strap ("Booster," Trial Run, January 2000), the straps are installed incorrectly. For best performance, the elastic portion of the strap, marked Booster, should go across the front of the boot cuff.he Union. West Virginians have more of a skiing bond with the peoples of New Hampshire or Vermont than lowland skiing peoples of Virginia or North Carolina.
Robert Allen
West Virginia

Just testing you, of course.-Ed.

Correction
In the photo accompanying our review of the Booster strap ("Booster," Trial Run, January 2000), the straps are installed incorrectly. For best performance, the elastic portion of the strap, marked Booster, should go across the front of the boot cuff.

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