If you ride switch a lot, this may be the binding for you. The Deadbolts zero ramp angle keeps your boot level underfoot and puts your shins in a neutral stance, which is ideal for switch riding, and 180-degrees of release range relieves pressure to your knees during a regular or switch twisting crash. A 5-15 DIN range and psychedelic styling complete this limited-edition binding.$374.99;

Best Bindings

A binding is a binding, right? Wrong. Binding technology has come a long way in the last few years. Here is a look at what's new.

$435 We love the Marker Baron so much that we borrowed a fleet of them from Marker to mount on all of our backcountry test skis. When the Baron's predecessor, the DIN-16 Duke, debuted in 2007, it was the only alpine-touring binding that truly skied like a real alpine binding. Word spread, and shops literally could not keep it stocked. Marker released the Baron in 2008. It has the same alpine-style performance as the Duke—solid, secure, and confidence-inspiring—but is 150 grams lighter (thanks to the use of nylon instead of magnesium), and $60 less expensive. And with a DIN range of four through 12, it's more of an everyman's binding. If you're skiing the resort most of the time, but want touring capability for occasional side- and backcountry laps, you won't find a better binding.

Backcountry Bindings

Whether you're going on a day-long tour or just heading out the gates, you need a binding that works as well going uphill as it does going down. Here is a collection of some of the best AT and telemark bindings out there.


A.T. Bindings

Alpine touring bindings fall into two camps, tech-style and frame-style. They’re like apples and oranges. But there’s plenty of nitpicking to do within each category. Find your next AT binders here.