Fact and Figures¿World Alpine Skiing 2000-01

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March 16, 2001 (FIS)--Some interesting facts and figures to come out of the alpine World Cup this season. Take a look.

Teenage Winners:
Two months after her 19th birthday, Janica Kostelic of Croatia won the overall World Cup standings at Are, Sweden. She is the fourth teenage winner in history, but not the youngest. Annemarie Moser-Proell of Austria was exactly 18 years old when she triumphed in 1971, Michelle Jacot of France was 18 years and three months when she clinched the title in 1970 and Michela Figini of Switzerland was not yet 19 when she went to the top, in 1985.

With her nine wins for the season, Croatia's first world-class ski-racer, who collected her first win at the age of 17 when she took the St Anton combination, brought the average age of the winners down to under 25. Régine Cavagnoud of France was the only winner over 30 - the French athlete started collecting victories only after her 28th birthday.

"Older" Winners:
Anita Wachter of Austria, who managed to grab a victory last year at 33 years of age, could not follow up in this, her final season, and had to be content with a best of eighth place.

On the men's tour, Michael von Gruenigen of Switzerland, Austrian Stephan Eberharter and Sweden's Frederik Nyberg were three successful racers of the "old" generation. They all celebrate their 33rd birthday within the next few days.

However, they were beaten by Hannes Trinkl of Austria, who, at the age of 33, became the oldest World Champion in history when he took gold in the downhill in St Anton, and Swiss skier Paul Accola, 34, who became the oldest World Championship medal-winner ever when he clinched bronze in the combined.

A Few Statistical Details:
Austria topped the nation's standings for the 12th time in a row, but in terms of podium places the upward trend was broken for the first time since the season of 1994/95.

After 107 podium places last season, the Austrian racers won "only" 80 this year. The number of victories decreased from 39 to 30, the women's wins from 14 to six. However, 39.6% of the podium finishes were taken by Austrian racers. In other words, in each World Cup race there was an Austrian among the top three.

Thirteen Victories:
This was Swedish skiing legend Ingemar Stenmark's record set in 1978/79, which was tied by Austrian Hermann Maier this season. The Swedish racer set his record by winning ten giant slaloms and three slaloms.

Maier would have very likely beaten this record were it not for the number of races cancelled this season: six men's races and three women's had to be cancelled ¿ more than ever before.

Eight Slalom Races in a Row:
These were taken by Kostelic, plus a combination. With her winning streak she tied Swiss skier Vreni Schneider's record. The Swiss woman had won seven slalom races in the 1988/89 season, plus the first in the 1989/90 season.

Schneider remains the only racer to win all the slaloms events in oneseason. Kostelic, however, has actually won ten in a row: before winning eight races this year, she won two others at the beginning of last season before being sidelined for a full year due to a torn ligament.

Series:
At Are, an incredible series almost ended. Von Gruenigen slippedwith only a few gates to go in the giant slalom but was able to remain standing thanks to an acrobatic move. The incident cost him the World Cup crystal globe, but von Gruenigen can continue to prolong his series: since1992, in Adelboden, he has not been eliminated once in 76 World Cup giant slaloms. His last failure occurred in the Lillehammer Olympic Games in 1994.

High Numbers I:
Running number 35, Austrian Heinz Schilchegger won the first slalom of his career. Only two racers managed to win from further behind: Mario Matt of Austria had number 47 at Kitzbeuhel last year, whileItalian Piero Gros ran number 47 at Madonna di Campiglio in 1972. The Italian managed a very rarechievement as it was his first World Cup race ever.

High Numbers II:
There were only two more winners with numbers higher than 30: Christoph Gruber of Austria took the Bormio giant slalom with number 32 and Maier the Kvitfjell downhill with number 31.

High Numbers III:
On the women's tour, all the downhill winners had numbers between 22 to 30, as Austrian Renate Goetschl and Italian Isolde Kostner always choose high numbers. These tactics failed at Lenzerheide and Are, where Kirsten Clark of America and Hilde Gerg of Germany won with number five.

US Podium Finishes:
US racers finished on the giant slalom podium for the first time since Phil Mahre in 1984. Two racers were successful: Bode Miller (3rd place at Val d'Isère) and Erik Schlopy at Bormio and Are. Schlopy is the most prominent racer who came back to the World Cup from the US Professional tour (1996 - 1999).

Slalom Juniors:
Three years ago the men's slalom was clearly dominated by older racers. At 29 years and eight months, Austrian Thomas Sykora wasby far the youngest World Cup winner then as Alberto Tomba of Italy, Austrian Thomas Stangassinger and Finn Jagge of Norway were over 32.

Now, however, Schilchegger, 27, is by far the oldest. Austrian Benjamin Raich, Matt and Pierrick Bourgeat of France belong to the young carving generation.

First wins:
Apart from Schilchegger, Hans-Petter Buraas of Norway also celebrated his first career victory. The Norwegian has been OlympicChampion, but in the World Cup he had never been lucky. It was only well after the race that he knew about his victory as Schilchegger, who had posted the fastest time in the Sestriere slalom, was disqualified.

First victories were also realised by Italian Alessandro Fattori in thedownhill, Gruber in giant slalom, both Petra Haltmayr of Germany and Clark in downhill, as well as Carole Montillet of France in super-G.

Moving Up I:
Bourgeat is a specialist for moving up from behind. Two years ago, when he won his first race at Park City, he jumped from 14th to thetop, and this season, in Shigakogen, he leaped from ninth to first.

As well, he came from behind to finish on the podium another two times: in 1998 at Grajnska Gora he moved up from 18th to second, while at Sestriere this year he finished third from 21st place. However, he has proved he is also able to win from the top position: in the second slalom at Shigakogen, he won after posting the fastest time in the first run.

Moving Up II:
Even more successful than Bourgeat was Germany's Martina Ertl: she won the opening giant slalom at Soelden from 17th place, which is the record on the women's tour.

The all-time best is held by Raich, who won at Schladming two years ago, moving up from 23rd place. Even 27 places were made up by Austrian Karin Koellerer (from 30th to third at Berchtesgaden last year). Also impressive is Switzerland's Urs Imboden who moved up from 30th to fifth at Park City.

Record Margins Men:
Only six out of 32 men's races ended with a margin of a second or more. Four times the winner was Maier, with 1.74 seconds being the largest lead, once von Gruenigen (1.64 at Les Arcs) and once Raich (1.29 seconds in the Wengen slalom).

In the speed events, however, the margins were as small as never before: the downhills were never won by a margin larger than 0.5 seconds, while in the super-Gs ¿ with one exception ¿ it was 0.32 seconds at best.

Record Margins Women:
In the women's races the margins were even smaller. In only four races out of 33 was the winner more than a second ahead. Sonja Nef of Switzerland took the Are giant slalom with the season's best of 1.79 seconds. Kostelic managed to win three slaloms with a margin of more than a second.

Smallest Margin:
Twice there was only 0.01 seconds between the winner and the runner-up, strangely enough in the two Garmisch super-Gs. The men's race was won by Gruber 0.01 seconds ahead of Maier, while the super-G was taken by Goetschl ahead of Montillet.

Brands:
The brand standings were clearly won by Atomic (men) andSalomon (women).

Men:
1. Atomic 10,536 points.
2. Salomon 3,130.
3. Head 2,284.
4. Fischer 1,650.
5 .Rossignol 1,461.
6. Nordica 1,197.
7. Stoeckli 948.
8. Völkl 699.
9. Elan 641.
10. Dynastar 341.

Women:
1. Salomon 8,172.
2. Rossignol 4,325.
3. Völkl 3,223.
4. Fischer 2,330.
5. Atomic 2,019.
6. Blizzard 1,957.
7. Dynastar 800.
8. Elan 397.
9. Nordica 330.
10. Head 138.
11. Stöckli 5.
men's race was won by Gruber 0.01 seconds ahead of Maier, while the super-G was taken by Goetschl ahead of Montillet.

Brands:
The brand standings were clearly won by Atomic (men) andSalomon (women).

Men:
1. Atomic 10,536 points.
2. Salomon 3,130.
3. Head 2,284.
4. Fischer 1,650.
5 .Rossignol 1,461.
6. Nordica 1,197.
7. Stoeckli 948.
8. Völkl 699.
9. Elan 641.
10. Dynastar 341.

Women:
1. Salomon 8,172.
2. Rossignol 4,325.
3. Völkl 3,223.
4. Fischer 2,330.
5. Atomic 2,019.
6. Blizzard 1,957.
7. Dynastar 800.
8. Elan 397.
9. Nordica 330.
10. Head 138.
11. Stöckli 5.

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