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Glove Letters: The Favorites

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My hand-comfort dilemma? It's a wacky combination of my poor appendages tending to get really cold but also sweating a lot. So my search last season…

My hand-comfort dilemma? It’s a wacky combination of my poor appendages tending to get really cold but also sweating a lot. So my search last season was for warm ski gloves that breathe, a search that ultimately brought me to the Marmot Randonnée. The brawny but not stiff Cordura shell and fluffy Primaloft insulation kept my hands cozy; the breathable outer coating and velourlike moisture-wicking lining kept them dry — with extra protection provided by the Gore-Tex insert sandwiched somewhere inside. Perhaps the glove’s best feature came as a bonus to me: The palm is reinforced with soft, grippy, water-resistant Pittard Digital leather. $99/Marmot/707-544-4590/www.marmot.com — B.W.

I've always valued ski gloves mainly for warmth; nothing makes me beat a hastier retreat to the lodge than frozen extremities. But I never…

I’ve always valued ski gloves mainly for warmth; nothing makes me beat a hastier retreat to the lodge than frozen extremities. But I never appreciated dexterity until I tried Kombi‘s Gore Basic III with the new Gore-Tex soft insert sandwiched between the shell and insulating layer. With this thinner, softer laminate, these gloves have been perfect for everything from accessing stuff in my backpack during a week of ski mountaineering to zipping up dozens of jackets for the kids I teach in ski school. And as for warmth, the Primaloft insulation and wicking lining kept me out on the slopes. $54/Kombi/800-243-6117/ www.kombisports.com — Cindy Hirschfeld

Patagonia's Stretch Triolet gloves were dreamt up for the inhuman conditions encountered climbing frozen waterfalls -- where warmth, knuckle-banging…

Patagonia‘s Stretch Triolet gloves were dreamt up for the inhuman conditions encountered climbing frozen waterfalls — where warmth, knuckle-banging protection, and dexterity are all paramount. These same traits enable the Triolets to excel at any active winter task. I slipped them on and was taken by their relaxed, anatomic fit. Streamlined, rhino-tough shells are fitted with stretchy panels across the back and grippy, waterproof-leather palms. Triolets are obviously not as warm as monster mittens or lunar-landing gloves, but their removable, quick-drying liners provide solid midwinter comfort. Other thoughtful details include a one-hand pull elastic cuff and a gusset to keep out spindrift. $99/Patagonia/800-638-6464/www.patagonia.com — Brian Litz

I have big hands with long, thin fingers. Great for basketball and finger puppets, not great for cold weather -- my hands are often freezing, if not…

I have big hands with long, thin fingers. Great for basketball and finger puppets, not great for cold weather — my hands are often freezing, if not numb. So last year, I set out on a glove quest to find the warmest of the warm, testing almost two dozen pairs. The unmistakable winner was the Grandoe GCS Hurricane. It takes a perfectly warm combination of materials — Primaloft insulation sheathed in Gore-Tex, wrapped in Windstopper and stretchy Cordura — and adds a removable merino wool liner. Like an extra blanket on a cold night, it kept my hands toasty on the most frigid days. $110/Grandoe/800-GRANDOE/www.grandoe.com — Michael Miracle

The problem with most modular gloves is that there's always a weak link in the system -- usually the inner glove. You pull off the shell to find your…

The problem with most modular gloves is that there’s always a weak link in the system — usually the inner glove. You pull off the shell to find your hand wrapped in a misshapen pile of fuzz about as performance oriented as a hand-knitted muffler. Gates‘s Fusion system solves this problem with a flexible, moisture-managing inner glove — the Core. The Core performed well on its own for cross-country skiing and cool-weather cycling. To make a complete gauntlet glove that worked for most ski conditions, I slipped the Core into the bombproof Gamma Reactor shell. (For colder days, consider the insulated Beta Reactor). $35 Core, $45 Shell/Gates/518-762-4526/www.gatesgloves.com — Shawn Magee

The buttery soft, water-repellent Pittards leather palm is what first attracted me to the Hotfingers Phaser. But this glove was designed specifically…

The buttery soft, water-repellent Pittards leather palm is what first attracted me to the Hotfingers Phaser. But this glove was designed specifically for women, with the help of freeskier Wendy Fisher. It uses ComforTemp to store body heat and release it back when hands get cold, which is especially useful for women, whose hands, on average, get cooler than men’s. The sweat-wicking Coolmax lining and Gore-Tex insert add more firepower to the battle against cold and wet. The Phaser’s grip is articulated for a woman’s hand, making it easier to grip poles in the cold. $100/Hotfingers by Swany/800-237-9269/www.swanyamerica.com — Iseult Devlin