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With SportCamX ($699) you can relive your powder escapades anytime you want. Simply slip the virtually weightless mini-video camera over your helmet…

With SportCamX ($699) you can relive your powder escapades anytime you want. Simply slip the virtually weightless mini-video camera over your helmet or hat.; insert one cord from the camera into a wallet-size battery case; plug the other into the RCA input of your personal video camera; and stuff it all in a padded waist pack. SportCamX’s lens stays fog-free, and the camera is so light that you’d forget it’s there except for the frequently asked question: “Is that a camera on your head?” Expect skiers to ham it up as you fly by, providing great footage of them tracking up the powder-in silence: There is no audio recording option. You may look funny with a camera on your head, but everyone else will look a lot funnier on your TV screen. 406-387-5732; www.customvideocameras.com.
-Krista Crabtree

The 32-page owner's manual is your first clue: Suunto's AdVizor

The 32-page owner’s manual is your first clue: Suunto’s AdVizor “wrist-top computer” with heart-rate monitor ($269) is smarter than the average wristwatch. The AdVizor has all the features you’d expect from an outdoor sports watch: altimeter, barometer, compass, stopwatch-all fairly simple to use with a little practice. The heart-rate monitor adds a dimension for those who take an especially analytical approach to training. On the hill, skiers can keep an eye on barometric pressure trends while tracking altitude, bearing and total vertical. The AdVizor is chunky, bulging a half-inch off the wearer’s wrist; but it’s lightweight, waterproof and rugged. And, yes, it tells time. 800-543-9124, www.suuntousa.com.
-Joe Cutts

Nothing will earn you bragging rights like the SportsTracker, a tiny GPS unit that records where and how fast you ski. Just clip component A (see…

Nothing will earn you bragging rights like the SportsTracker, a tiny GPS unit that records where and how fast you ski. Just clip component A (see photo) on your shoulder, drop five-ounce component B in your pocket and forget they’re there. The tracker uplinks data every five seconds, so it can show how you topped out at 52 mph on your favorite cruiser, then slowed down to let your buddies catch up. But leave your downhill suit at home: The unit’s been rigged to stop measuring your speed after 55 mph. Trackers can currently be rented in Grand Targhee, Wyo., and in Vail and Beaver Creek, Colo., but the company hopes to have units for sale by next season. Daily rental is $11; maps showing runs skied and speed throughout cost $14-$17. 888-552-8735; www.maptrek.com.
-kellee katagi

Two-way radios are becoming standard ski equipment, but few have as many bells and whistles as the Motorola Talkabout T6320 ($143 each). The…

Two-way radios are becoming standard ski equipment, but few have as many bells and whistles as the Motorola Talkabout T6320 ($143 each). The palm-sized radio adds little bulk to a parka pocket, but boasts a clock, alarm, stopwatch and vibrating call alert. The Eavesdrop Eliminator feature might seem paranoid-until four uninvited conversations interrupt your own. Navigate with the altimeter and compass, and stay abreast of the weather with the barometer or-even better-activate the weather alert, which interrupts both talk and FM modes with emergency advisories. The drawback? Talk-about’s two-mile range in open terrain diminishes over peaks. Translation: Contacting your friends in the back bowls from the base lodge might be dicey. 800-353-2729; www.motorola.com.
-maureen drummey

Every few years, a leap in technology changes your life. If you drive, consider your life changed. The Magellan 750NAV vehicle navigation system can…

Every few years, a leap in technology changes your life. If you drive, consider your life changed. The Magellan 750NAV vehicle navigation system can literally take you 1,739 miles from the front steps of the Empire State Building to the lobby of the Little Nell Hotel in Aspen, Colo., without missing a turn. Key in “Little Nell” on the touch pad, and the GPS system does the rest, giving you clear, turn-by-turn voice and visual directions. If you miss an exit, the system automatically recalculates a new itinerary. You can select the quickest route or request less highway driving. The device is priceless when you’ve rented an airport car and need to drive to a remote resort or find a recommended ski shop in a new town. The standard model is the 750NAV. New this season is the 750M (mobile), which is smaller than a laptop computer and can be transferred between vehicles. In the Hertz rental fleet, the system is called NeverLost, and performance lives up to the product’s name. At $2,800, the 750NAV isn’t cheap. But with vehicle GPSs becoming factory-standard features soon (bet on it), prices should fall. The 750NAV’s voice (male or female) even speaks seven languages, in the improbable event that you do get very lost, indeed. 877-422-7628; www.magellangps.com
-Greg trinker